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Healthy Food for Two: Pomegranate-dressed Brussels sprouts

By Ania Robertson

Please, give Brussels sprouts a chance. The offensive odor only occurs when this vegetable is overcooked and comes from a sulfur-containing compound, a type of glucosinolate, that supports two detoxification’s stages of the human body. This compound, it’s a good thing!

First, it helps to activate enzyme systems in cells that are required for detoxification of the harmful substances created daily in the body. And later, this compound prevents against the accumulation of the toxins in the body by removing them from the body.

Brussels sprouts not only help to break those toxins down, but also help remove them safely from the body. Brussels sprouts are rich in many valuable nutrients such as vitamins A, B-complex, C and K and minerals manganese, copper, potassium and phosphorus. They help supply dietary fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, as well. In addition, the chemical compound sulforaphane is also believed to have anticarcinogenic properties.

Brussels sprouts in a pomegranate dressing

20 medium Brussels sprouts

1/4 teaspoon of salt

4 tablespoons pure pomegranate juice

2 tablespoons pomegranate seeds for garnish

1/4 teaspoon raw honey

dash black pepper, freshly ground

smidgen of sea salt or rock (Himalayan) salt

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Trim stems of Brussels sprouts and cut an “X” at the bottom of each stem. This opening will help the bitterness escape as it cooks. Also, the cut lines will help heat reach the core for more even cooking.

Fit a pot with a steamer insert; fill with water to bottom of insert Cover and bring to a boil. Add Brussels sprouts and season with salt. Steam about 8 minutes or until bright green and just tender, tossing halfway through. Transfer to a bowl and toss with the dressing.

Garnish with pomegranate seeds.

Dressing:

Whisk juice, honey, pepper, oil and salt together vigorously.

Ania Robertson is a certified life coach with additional certification in Ayurveda and Feng Shui.