July 30, 2014

All this weeks Public Safety Articles

Police Notes

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Embezzlement

Joshua Clark

Joshua Clark

Joshua Clark, 22, of Waterbury was cited on a charge of embezzlement on July 8, according to police reports. Mountain Air Systems reported to the Williston Police Department that Clark had been using a company credit card to transfer money to his personal bank accounts and also paid for his cell phone bill, according to the report. To date, Clark is accused of stealing nearly $3,000 from the company, the report notes. Clark is scheduled to appear in court on July 31.

Identity Theft
MUGSHOT-Logan Corey

On July 1, as the result of an investigation by the Williston Police Department, Logan Corey, 20, of St. Albans was arrested on charges of felony identity theft, felony false impersonation and a misdemeanor count of petit larceny stemming from charges related to the theft and use of an EBT card, according to police reports. Corey was lodged at the Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility.

Assault
Larry Kirby, 41, of Williston was cited on a charge of domestic assault after an altercation was reported to and investigated by police on June 25, according to police reports. He was taken to Chittenden County Correctional Facility.
William A. Myers, 26, who is homeless, was cited on a charge of simple assault on June 26, according to police reports. He was taken to Chittenden County Correctional Facility.
Pierre Begeleus, 37, of Williston was cited on a charge of domestic assault after an altercation at a Williston home on June 25, according to police reports. He was taken to Chittenden County Correctional Facility and held for lack of $1,000 bail.

Driving with suspended license
Christopher J. Clark, 25, of Hinesburg was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on June 23, according to police reports. He was cited to appear in court.
Robert Daley, 36, of Underhill was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on June 30, according to police reports. No other information was released.
Police notes are written based on information provided by the Williston Police Department and the Vermont State Police. Please note that all parties are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

All this weeks Public Safety Articles

Black bear complaints rising

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Intentionally feeding bears is illegal in Vermont and is bad for the bears. A bear that has found food near a house or business will almost always return. It is difficult to remove problem bears, and they almost always have to be put down.

Intentionally feeding bears is illegal in Vermont and is bad for the bears. A bear that has found food near a house or business will almost always return. It is difficult to remove problem bears, and they almost always have to be put down.

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department has received a large number of calls recently from members of the public complaining about bears.
“Our phones have been ringing constantly the last couple of weeks with calls from people asking what to do about a bear that has been visiting their yard,” said Col. David LeCours, Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s director of law enforcement. “The first thing we tell them is to identify and remove whatever is attracting the bears.”
People often inadvertently encourage bears to come out of the forest by providing food without realizing it. Some of the most common sources of food that attract bears are pet food, bird feeders, barbecue grills, household trash containers or dumpsters and campsites with accessible food or food waste.
Bears that have found food near someone’s house nearly always return to find more, developing habits that can lead to the bear’s ultimate demise. Relocating a nuisance bear is very difficult—they frequently have to be put down.
“People often assume that we can just capture and move a bear to a more remote area once it becomes a problem,” said Forrest Hammond, Vermont Fish & Wildlife’s bear project leader. “Bears can easily move dozens or even hundreds of miles in search of food, so there’s really nowhere in Vermont we can put a bear that it won’t find people’s houses if it’s determined. Prevention is really the key. The only way to deal with a problem bear is to remove whatever is attracting it in the first place.”
Feeding a bear is not just bad for the bear, it’s also illegal. A law was passed in 2013 making it against the law to feed a bear and wardens have begun issuing tickets to violators. A Montgomery man was charged by the Fish & Wildlife Department for intentionally feeding bears earlier this month.
Vermont law also states that residents must take reasonable measures to protect their property from bears before lethal force can be taken. Some of these measures include:

  • Keep chickens and honeybees secure within an electric fence or other bear-proof enclosure.
  • Never feed bears, deliberately or accidentally.
  • Feed your pets indoors.
  • Do not feed birds April 1 through Nov. 30. Bringing feeders in at night doesn’t work, because of seed that is spilled on the ground.
  • Store trash in a secure place. Trash cans alone are not enough.
  • “We’re in a period of transition with this new law,” said Hammond. “People are really starting to get the message and have been taking steps to scare bears away or remove attractants as the law dictates, rather than just shooting the bear.”
  • “Our wardens have been a tremendous help in our efforts to habituate bears to stay away from people when there is a problem,” said Hammond. “They’ve been working overtime trying to help landowners while also striving to save the lives of these bears.”

For more information about living with Vermont’s black bears, visit www.vtfishandwildlife.com.