April 24, 2014

THE HUB: Free summer classes open to area businesses at CCV

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The Community College of Vermont is offering several 3-credit, undergraduate courses at select center locations this summer to businesses at no-cost. Funding for these courses is provided through the U.S. Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant Program.
Principles of Supervision is geared toward supervisors, managers and employees who are ready for leadership positions according to their employers. Topics covered in this course include communication, goal setting, delegation, time and stress management, performance appraisal, the hiring process, motivation and responses to technology.
Principles of Supervision is offered at the following times and locations:
Montpelier
Thursdays, 5 – 7 p.m., May 22 – July 31Tuesdays, 5:30 – 9 p.m. June 3 – Aug. 19

Middlebury
Tuesdays, 5 – 8:15 p.m., May 21 – Aug. 5

Winooski
Wednesdays, 6 – 9 p.m., May 21-Aug. 20

In addition, two free online classes are open to the public, Professional Financial Literacy and Introduction to Internet Marketing, and are being offered May 20 – Aug. 5.
Classes are filling quickly. To enroll, contact [email protected]

THE HUB: Williston company climbing to the highest peaks

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Caroline George (left) sports a pair of Julbo glasses during a mountaineering expedition.

Caroline George (left) sports a pair of Julbo glasses during a mountaineering expedition.

April 17th, 2014

By Phyl Newbeck
Observer correspondent
When you watch freeride skiing pioneer Glen Plake, the first question that probably comes to mind is how does he keep his trademark Mohawk so high. We can’t answer that one, but we can answer any question you might have about his eyewear.
Plake wears goggles made by a company called Julbo, whose U.S. office is based right here in Williston. Plake isn’t the only famous athlete to sport Julbos. High-altitude mountaineer Ed Viesturs, who recently became the first American to climb all 14 of the world’s highest mountains without supplemental oxygen, wears its mountaineering glasses.
Julbo is a third generation French optical company that started in the 1850s making shades for crystal hunters in the Alps who were searching for gems to bring down the mountain to the tourists. The company’s headquarters is in Europe, but in 1974, Climb High of Shelburne began distributing Julbo’s products in the U.S. In 2002, Nick Yardley set up shop in Williston to create Julbo USA, the exclusive distributor of Julbo eyewear in this country. The Williston location serves as an office and warehouse distribution center. All the company’s domestic shipping is done from its Avenue D location.
Yardley said the company’s biggest impact has been in the mountaineering market, creating glasses for those summiting major peaks like Mount Everest. Three years ago, Julbo began to manufacture ski goggles and now it also carries performance sunglasses for runners, mountain bikers and other athletes, as well as prescription glasses. The company has also added a line of high quality children’s sunglasses. Yardley noted that while adults are aware of the need to protect their eyes from harmful rays, they often neglect to protect their children, whose eyes are significantly more sensitive.
Yardley said the company’s biggest strength is its photochromatic lenses, which change from light to dark depending on the UV light.
“There has been a strong emphasis on interchangeable lenses in the sports world,” he said “but that’s very dysfunctional because you don’t have time to change lenses when you’re cycling from a field into a forest or skiing from bright light into fog.”
Previously, photochromatic lenses were made with a coating, which fades over time, but Julbo’s product has the dye within the lens so it can’t scratch, burn off or fade. Yardley used the example of a ski patroller who starts his or her morning with trail checks in dim light and then skis through the day under bright sunlight before ending his or her shift with a sweep run which might be in the dark.
“They can use these goggles all day long in white-out and bluebird bright skies,” he said. “It becomes a very versatile tool for the serious outdoor user.”
Locally, Julbo products can be purchased at Outdoor Gear Exchange, EMS and the Optical Center on Church Street. The latter specializes in children’s eyewear and prescription products. Julbo USA is involved in a variety of local events, including the summer trail running series at Catamount Family Center. This year, they will also sponsor a new event called the Catamount Ultra, a 50-kilometer trail run at Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe.
Serena Wilcox of Burlington, the first woman to cross the finish line at the annual 100-mile trail run in Windsor in 2011, is a believer. She wears a wide assortment of Julbo products including “everyday glasses” and ones designed for hiking, running and biking.
“I love the way they change from darker to lighter depending on the light I am in,” she said. “The glasses fit my face well, are lightweight and are great for trail running and biking.”
Andrea Charest, owner of Petra Cliffs in Burlington, also swears by Julbo sunglasses for rock and ice climbing and ski touring.
“The way they change color is perfect for every condition in the mountains,” she said.
One of New England’s top alpine climbers, Kevin Mahoney of New Hampshire, agrees.
“Julbo has been great for me for the simple reason of laziness,” he said. “I like putting on my sunglasses in the morning and leaving them on all day. Simplicity and performance is the best combination.”

One of Julbo’s biggest advantages, says U.S. distributor Nick Yardley, is its photochromatic lenses, which change from light to dark depending on the UV light.

One of Julbo’s biggest advantages, says U.S. distributor Nick Yardley, is its photochromatic lenses, which change from light to dark depending on the UV light.

Sports Roundup

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April 17th, 2014

By Mal Boright
Observer correspondent

CVU tennis teams netting a spring break
The Champlain Valley Union High tennis teams took 3-1 records into Wednesday’s scheduled matches with Rice Memorial High, the boys at the home Davis Park courts in Shelburne while the girls were on the road.
The matches were their last until Monday (April 28) following the spring break.
Both teams won Monday, the defending Division 1 champion girls beating Burlington High 6-1 at Davis Park while the boys tripped the Seahorses 4-3 at BHS’s Leddy Park home courts.
Last week, the girls lost their first match in a couple of seasons, 5-2 to South Burlington, but recovered nicely against BHS.
Winning all five singles matches were Kathy Joseph, Leah Epstein, MacKenzie Buckman, Elyse Killkelley and Isabelle Angstman.
The team of Erika Barth and Vina Nguyen scored a doubles victory.
The boys’ victory came on singles triumphs by George Lomas and Joey O’Brien, while the doubles combinations of David Huber-Stephen Asch and Louie Daub-Ryan Schneiderman were winners.
CVU track and field team has some time off
Following their scheduled home meet Wednesday afternoon, the Champlain Valley Union High track and field team will be literally cooling its heels, jets, muscles and batons until April 30 (a Wednesday) when it travels to North Country Union for a four-school event.
Last week, the Redhawks opened the season with a stunning 23 first places, 14 of those by the girls in rolling past Enosburg High, Hazen Union and Lamoille Union.
Zach Akey was the lone Redhawk double victory, taking the boys 100 and 200 dashes. Peter Hibbeler won the 300 hurdles and took second in the 100 hurdles.
On the girls’ side, CVU won four individual races (Haliana Burhans,100; Sadie Casale, 200; Autumn Eastman, 800; Sophia Gorman 1,500) and swept the three relay events.
Rachel Slimovitch, second in the 800, won the pole vault. Jessie Johnson won the triple jump and was runner-up on the vault.
According to assistant coach Scott Bliss, it was a challenging day for runners with high and gusty winds a definite factor.

Nordic coaches honor seven CVU skiers
Champlain Valley Union High Nordic skiers picked up seven Division 1 All-Star selections as chosen by the coaches.
From the girls team, Autumn Eastman, Cally Braun and Rachel Slimovitch gained first team awards while Tatum Braun earned honorable mention.
First team winners among the boys were Thomas Clayton, Charlie Maitland and Cooper Wilsey.

2nd unbeaten season for CVU JV girls hoops

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April 17th, 2014

By Mal Boright
Observer correspondent
The recently completed girls basketball season was a 24-0 prefecto for the varsity.
But the junior varsity and the freshman teams were sipping the same orange juice—the jayvees put up a second straight 20-0 mark while coach Katie Kuntz’ freshmen went 12-0.
That’s an overall 56-0 mark, which, as the old saying goes, is not at all shabby.
Jayvee coach Kathy Kohlasch said in a recent phone chat with the Observer that both the junior varsity and freshman groups “played well as teams.”
The jayvees were dominant all season, knocking down 1,047 points for an average of about 52 while allowing just 420, or 21 per outing. That’s some serious bopping.
Top scorer was sophomore guard-forward Amanda Daniels with 148 points, followed closely by sophomore guard Madison Randall with 132. Freshman forward Abby Thut had 120, sophomore forward Catherine Cazayoux 118, while freshman forward Marlee Gunn and sophomore forward-guard Maeve Higgins each bagged 116 tallies.
Leading rebounders included Thut, sophomore Emma Frost and sophomore Lia Gagliuso.
Kohlasch said the top playmakers were Randall, sophomore Vina Nguyen and sophomore Annie Keen.
Dropping long buckets from out deep were junior Makayla Merchant and sophomore Emma Hess.
Defense is more than just a word with the program and among super active defenders were Higgins and Cazayoux.
Sophomore Annabella Pugliese, on the varsity roster, saw some playing minutes with the jayvees. Daniels and Randall dressed with the varsity during the four-game playoff season while Higgins and Gagliuso practiced with the big team during the postseason.
Kohlasch is optimistic about the future prospects for players on both jayvee and freshman rosters.

PHOTOS: CVU boys lacrosse

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Alex Bulla takes a shot on the Essex goal during Saturday’s game. (Observer photos by Al Frey)

Alex Bulla takes a shot on the Essex goal during Saturday’s game. (Observer photos by Al Frey)

Zach Evans stays out of the reach of his Essex defender on Saturday.

Zach Evans stays out of the reach of his Essex defender on Saturday.

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Maine trip ends early season tests for boys lacrosse

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Alex Bulla takes a shot on the Essex goal during Saturday’s game. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Alex Bulla takes a shot on the Essex goal during Saturday’s game. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

April 17th, 2014

By Mal Boright
Observer correspondent
Having banked victories against tough foes Essex High and Hanover (N.H.) High Saturday and Monday, the defending Division 1 boys lacrosse champion Champlain Valley Union High Redhawks were poised to visit a veteran 2-0 South Burlington High team Wednesday afternoon, after the Observer’s press deadline.
On Saturday, coach Dave Trevithick’s Red- and White-clads will travel to Cape Elizabeth, Me. for another out-of-state contest.
Then it will be a week off before the first home game of the season, when Mount Mansfield Union High’s Cougars come scratching at the Hawks’ hillside nest next Saturday morning (April 26).
Hanover, a Granite State lacrosse powerhouse, fell 10-6 as Dylan Schaefer (three goals), Matt Palmer (two scores) and Hoyt McCuin (one goal and three assists) paced the scorers.
If there is a Helper-of-the-Month honor, McCuin would be high on the list of eligibles. He now has nine assists in just two games.
Single goals were posted by Elliott Mitchell, Griffin DiParlo, Collin Osbahr and Steele DuBrul. Netminder Owen Hudson made 10 stops.
McCuin, with a goal and six assists, Nevin DiParlo with four goals, Palmer with three tallies, Mitchell with two goals and three helpers and Griffin DiParlo with two scores paced the offensive assault on a young Essex High team Saturday morning at the University of Vermont, which resulted in a 16-2 triumph over last year’s championship runner-up.
CVU broke it open early, taking an 8-0 lead by the end of the first period and boosting it to 12-1 by the half-time break. In that opening half, CVU held a 16-6 edge in shot on goal and a 7-4 advantage in face offs captured.
“We came out strong,” said co-captain Nevin DiParlo. Referencing the Redhawks’ veteran attackers and midfielders, DiParlo added, “Our guys have played together since middle school.”
“I knew we could score, but not like that,” said a mildly surprised Trevithick.
Adding single goals were DuBrul, Alex Bulla, Noah Kiernan and Kyle Jaunich.
Hudson had eight saves including a couple first period spectaculars that kept momentum on the Redhawks’ side. Chris Gronlund took over later in the game and had a pair of stoppers.
Bulla, a co-captain and midfielder, had praise for the UVM turf field and facility, which provided a spectacular season-opening venue for the two lacrosse rivals.

PHOTOS: Firefighters flip flapjacks and find friends

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Firefighter Rik Roberts demonstrates equipment to visitors. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Firefighter Rik Roberts demonstrates equipment to visitors. (Observer photo by Steven Robert)

Youngsters try their hand at opening a fire hydrant. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Youngsters try their hand at opening a fire hydrant. (Observer photo by Steven Robert)

Firefighters dished out pancakes, sausage and other breakfast fare.  (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Firefighters dished out pancakes, sausage and other breakfast fare.
(Observer photo by Al Frey)

 Firefighter Nick Carson shows his gear to a small guest during the annual Williston Fire Department pancake breakfast, held on Sunday.  (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Firefighter Nick Carson shows his gear to a small guest during the annual Williston Fire Department pancake breakfast, held on Sunday. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

 The line of hungry neighbors snaked around the firehouse waiting their turn. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

The line of hungry neighbors snaked around the firehouse waiting their turn. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Fireman's Brkfst 4-13

Fireman's Brkfst 4-13

Fireman's Brkfst 4-13

Fireman's Brkfst 4-13

Observer photo by Steven Robert

Observer photo by Steven Robert

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Observer photo by Steven Robert

Observer photo by Steven Robert

 

Library Notes

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Youth news
Movie
Friday, April 18, 3 p.m. When Charlie finds a golden ticket he wins a tour of the ultimate candy factory in this original version of Roald Dahl’s classic tale. Rated G. Grades 1 and up. Free popcorn.
Story Time and Crafts
Tuesdays at 11 a.m. Preschoolers are introduced to a variety of books and authors while gaining early literacy skills. For children ages 3-5.
Fairy Stories and Drop-In Craft
Make a Fairy House Tuesday, April 22, 11 a.m. Fairy Stories with Natasha; 12-2 p.m. Fairy Houses: Make a fairy dwelling using natural materials. All ages. Children 8 and younger must be accompanied by an adult.
Welcome Baby Social
Wednesday, April 30, 6-7:15 p.m. Do you have a new member of the family? Join us for this free event open to all Williston/St.George residents with babies born in 2013. Light refreshments and music with Ellie from Ellie’s Preschool Parties. Pre-register at [email protected] or contact Danielle at 876-7555. Sponsored by Building Bright Futures and Dorothy Alling Memorial Library.
Spanish Playgroup
Saturday, May 3, 10:30 a.m. Spanish rhymes, books, and songs for children birth to age 5. Includes a craft activity and snack. Music with Constancia and crafts with Natasha. Sponsored by Building Bright Futures.

 

Programs for adults
Spring Centerpieces
Wednesday, April 16, 6:30 p.m. Arrange a spring bouquet with Sharon Niquette of “Buds and Roses.” Materials provided. Pre-registration required.
Tech Tutor
Thursday, April 17, 3-6 p.m. Guarantee a time by pre-registering for a 15-30 minute appointment.
Brown Bag Book Club
Friday, April 18, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Meet others who love to discuss books. This month we will discuss “Orphan Train” by Christina B. Kline. Books are available at the front desk. Coffee, tea, juice & dessert provided.
Shape and Share Life Stories
Monday, May 5, 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Learn to craft engaging stories from life experiences. Led by Recille Hamrell.
Turn Your Job Search Inside-Out to Find the Perfect Work for You!
Saturday, May 5, 6:30 p.m. Jim Koehneke teaches a unique approach to creating career happiness and living the life you have dreamed of. Whether you are unemployed, underemployed or not satisfied with your job, discover results in work you love.
Gentle Yoga with Jill Lang
Tuesdays, May 6, 13 and 27, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Presented by Williston resident, Jill Lang. Come and enjoy free classes. Please bring your own mat.

New in Youth Literature
Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award nominees and Green Mountain Book Award nominees
The 2014 lists of nominees for these two prestigious children’s literature awards have recently been announced and the Youth Room has many selections available, including:
“Twerp” by Mark Goldblatt (a DCF book for juveniles)
“The Mouse with the Question Mark Tail” by Richard Peck (a DCF book for juveniles)
“’The president has been shot!’ the assassination of John F. Kennedy” by James Swanson (a non-fiction DCF book)
“The Caged Graves” by Dianne Salerni (a young adult GMBA book)
“The Coldest Girl in Coldtown” by Holly Black (a young adult GMBA book)

New in Adult Fiction
“The Collector” by Nora Roberts. The latest novel by this favorite author is a romantic murder mystery thriller.
“The Target” by David Baldacci. Will Robie in a newadventure.
The Dorothy Alling Memorial Library is located at 21 Library Lane in Williston, and can be reached at 878-4918. All events are free. www.williston.lib.vt.us

Letters to the Editor

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Thanks for the support
Once again, the voters of Williston have supported the school budget. Great thanks go out to all of you who took the time to vote, and especially everyone who was involved in the budgeting process.
Special thanks go out to our teachers. Enough cannot be said about their creativity, flexibility and resourcefulness. The impact of the changes in this year’s budget will affect them all, some more than others. So thank you all for the wonderful work you do. Three cheers for the administrators who have created a collegial environment among teachers and staff that made the task of putting this budget together possible. Last but not least, thanks to those of you who were in any way involved in the process. No matter how minor you think your contribution was, please know that it was much appreciated. Whether you took the time to talk to one of the school board members at the store, sent out an email or a text message with your suggestions, posted your thoughts on Facebook, attended a school board meeting or devoted hours of family time as a one of our “budget buddies” – we truly appreciate your involvement.
We are grateful for the strong community support. We recognize that voter support of our schools is earned, and that it comes with an obligation to deliver world-class education to our children. We acknowledge that we need to set the bar high for what we expect our children to learn today, so that they can become successful and productive members of society tomorrow. We know that we have to hold ourselves accountable for their academic achievement, and for motivating them to realize their full potential. Achieving excellence is hard work. But we owe that much to both our community who endorsed us in this recent election, and to our children, who are our future.
So thank you all again for your support. We pledge to continue to work hard to earn it.
-Kevin Brochu
Williston School District Board

Bruce Farm a brilliant opportunity
Thank you for the article regarding the potential conservation of the Bruce Farm. I would like to emphasize how brilliant an opportunity this is for our town.
As sprawl gobbles up more of Hinesburg and spreads along the periphery of Williston, this is a chance to keep open some of the farmland that defines Vermont’s character, maintain a wildlife corridor and expand the best natural trail system in Williston: connecting Five Tree Hill to the Isham Farm.
These trails, once protected, will bring pleasure to generations of our townspeople.
Preserving this farm also protects Allen Brook and various vanishing Vermont bird species.
As a town, let’s support this with all our enthusiasm!
-Page Hudson
Williston

CCTA board committed to employees and community

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April 17th, 2014

By Tom Buckley
CCTA’s mission is to promote and operate safe, convenient, accessible, innovative and sustainable public transportation services in the northwest and central Vermont region that reduce congestion and pollution, encourage transit-oriented development and enhance the quality of life for all.
The CCTA Board of Commissioners—the thirteen member volunteer board that sets the policy and financial direction of the organization—is fully committed to CCTA’s mission. Each of us is appointed by the elected board in our home community or our county’s regional planning commission and understands our obligation to ensure our fellow residents are served with safe, reliable and affordable transportation. These priorities guide our decisions.
Through the hard work of our drivers and administrative staff, CCTA is recognized as one of the highest performing small transit agencies in the country, with a strong safety record and a 70 percent increase in ridership since 2000. The Board is committed to nurturing an environment where this success can continue.
The recent strike demonstrated that important work needs to be done within CCTA to improve employee relations. To improve communication and show respect for our drivers, CCTA is creating an Employee Committee to focus on workplace enhancements, which will include multiple driver representatives. CCTA and the Union have also agreed to participate in the Federal Mediation & Conciliation Service’s most intensive interactive training program, known as “Relationship by Objective,” in which labor and management will work collaboratively towards an improved work environment.
The board has also taken action to respond to the concerns expressed by drivers in a thorough and respectful manner. At its meeting on March 31, the board passed a resolution establishing a new Operations Committee. The Operations Committee will focus on operational and human resources policies and procedures and will evaluate where adjustments and updates are warranted.
But we won’t stop there. The CCTA Board understands its obligation to passengers and the communities we serve. As chair of the board, I intend to work collaboratively with my fellow commissioners, the drivers and CCTA administrative staff to move CCTA forward so we can continue to expand and improve public transportation in the region.
Tom Buckley is the CCTA Board of Commissioners chair. Members of the CCTA Board of Commissioners are: Tom Buckley, representing the City of Winooski; Bob Buermann, representing Grand Isle County; Denis Barton, representing the Town of Shelburne; Catherine Dimitruk, representing Franklin County; Harold Garabedian, representing Washington County; Steve Magowan, representing the City of South Burlington; Karla Munson, representing the Town of Hinesburg; Brian Palaia, representing the Town of Milton; Marti Powers, representing the Town of Essex; Chapin Spencer, representing the City of Burlington; Al Turgeon, representing the Town of Williston; Bonnie Waninger, representing Lamoille County; Bethany Whitaker, representing the City of Burlington.