October 21, 2018

Allard raising money for breast cancer research

By Stephanie Choate
Observer staff

Almost every day before work, Williston resident Robin Allard walks 3 to 5 miles. On the weekends, she walks up to 10 miles.

Allard is training for the Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure July 23 to 25 in Boston, where she will walk 60 miles over three days to raise money for breast cancer research. The nonprofit Susan G. Komen for the Cure has raised nearly $1.5 billion for breast cancer research, treatment and prevention since it was founded in 1982.

“Everyone has been touched by breast cancer, it seems,” Allard said. “I’m amazed at how many people are affected by this …. It’s almost like everyone you know (has been affected) one way or another.”

Allard, her sisters Kim Poirier and Tanya Cushing, and her husband Jim Bagdon, have been raising money for Allard’s participation. Each registered walker must raise $2,300.

Last weekend, Allard held a two-day yard sale at her Williston home, where she sold things from her own household, along with donations from friends, family and community members.

“We were busy all the time, even with the rain on Saturday,” she said.

Allard raised nearly $1,500 at the sale. In fact, she said the family’s fund-raising has been so successful that Cushing decided to join the walk.

“I was prepared to walk it alone,” Allard said. “Now that we’ll be walking together, it’s kind of awesome. We’re all excited.”

Poirer and Bagdon will also travel to Boston to help with the event, and are signed up as volunteers.

The family has a personal connection to breast cancer. Allard’s sister, Sharron Allard, had breast cancer and died in 1996.

Allard said preparing for the race has brought back many memories.

“We miss her,” she said. “We are reminded every day how hard it is not having her here with us.”

The family needs to raise an additional $1,000 for Cushing’s registration fee.

For more information or to donate, visit www.the3day.org and search for Robin Allard’s personal page.

Community composting

Green cone installed at Lefebvre Lane garden

By Greg Duggan
Observer staff

When Williston Green Initiatives applied for a Community Waste Reduction grant from the Chittenden Solid Waste District, the local environmental group had only vague ideas for how to use any funding.

Community composting stood out as the main goal, but Williston Green Initiatives member Lynn Blevins said the group had to identify a neighborhood and determine the extent of any project. When the grant was approved by CSWD, Williston Green Initiatives reached out to the town through Front Porch Forum — a community e-mail newsletter. Residents at Lefebvre Lane responded, looking for suggestions on how to expand an existing community composting effort.

Members of Williston Green Initiatives visited the neighborhood’s community garden, which has two compost bins and three compost piles set up, and suggested the installation of a green cone.

“Quite a few people in the neighborhood compost their own food scraps in their own bins,” Blevins said. “But of course they’re not doing meat and dairy.”

A green cone consists of a basket that gets buried and a cone that extends above the ground. Meat, bones and dairy products can go into the cone and basket, where bacteria breaks down the waste and returns nutrients to the surrounding soil. Because the waste is stored underground, it doesn’t attract animals — a potential drawback with traditional compost piles.

“We have compost set up, but this sounded like it could add to what we have, so we thought we’d give it a shot,” said Cara Hunt, a Lefebvre Lane resident and member of the neighborhood’s community garden.

Blevins said the CSWD grant came to $117.50; Williston Green Initiatives used $72.50 of that to purchase the green cone from the Central Vermont Solid Waste Management District. Members of CSWD and Green Initiatives, as well as residents of Lefebvre Lane, installed the cone last week. The rest of the grant money will fund signs and informational pamphlets explaining how the green cone works.

“We’re really curious to see how it works out,” CSWD outreach coordinator Marge Keough said. “We’re optimistic that it works out well.”

Cutting waste in Chittenden County

Keough said CSWD had $2,000 available in grant money through its Community Waste Reduction grant program. The district put out a request for proposals in December, and Williston Green Initiatives was one of six groups to respond. All six projects received at least partial funding, and five of the proposals focused on composting, Keough said.

Keough said compost makes up nearly a third of landfill waste. Green cones are one way to reduce that waste, she said, as are backyard composting bins or bringing compost to CSWD drop-off centers.

The waste district has proposed a large composting facility on Redmond Road in Williston, which would replace the facility now operating at the Intervale in Burlington.

But as Blevins said, “The most efficient thing to do is home composting.” Hence the effort by Williston Green Initiatives to encourage local composting efforts.

“The idea of community composting is a long-term interest of ours,” Blevins said. “So this is the start, I would say.”

The green cone installed on Lefebvre Lane will accept 1 to 1.5 pounds of waste per day; with existing compost bins in place, Hunt doesn’t believe the neighborhood will exceed the limit for the green cone.

CSWD and Green Initiatives want to monitor the project to determine if it’s replicable in other communities.

If successful, Keough said, the model could be adopted by neighborhoods, condo associations or community gardens.

“We’re very hopeful that it will be a great project that can be replicated,” Keough said.

Schools stuck with modular classrooms

Buyers not materializing for trailers

By Greg Duggan
Observer staff

When voters from Franklin, Highgate and Swanton last week rejected funding to purchase modular classrooms for Missisquoi Valley Union High School, the Williston School District suffered a big setback in its efforts to remove the classrooms.

The temporary building permit for the classrooms, granted by Williston’s Development Review Board last year, required the trailers to be removed by Aug. 31. But with the latest setback, that scenario appears highly unlikely — unless the school district takes a major financial hit.

Williston installed the classrooms at the Allen Brook School in 2002 to accommodate a growing student population. Though the classrooms were meant to be temporary, the town’s Development Review Board in 2006 granted a second temporary building permit for the modular classrooms.

That permit carried a condition that school officials return to the Development Review Board in February 2008 with a master plan for the site, though that meeting failed to take place until September 2008. A protracted battle ensued for nearly a year, ending last August when the school district presented a master plan to remove the temporary classrooms by this August.

At the time, the district hoped to have a buyer for the classrooms. But the market for the modular classrooms is weaker than expected.

Bob Mason, chief operations officer for Chittenden South Supervisory Union, said he has had about a dozen inquiries about purchasing the trailers over the past year, but interest wanes once potential buyers learn the total cost of dismantling and transporting the classrooms.

Missisquoi Valley Union High School had expressed the most interest, though that possibility fell through when voters denied funding for the purchase.

At a School Board meeting on Monday night, Mason and District Principal Walter Nardelli provided the board with four options for the modular classrooms: deconstruct the units, salvage the components and restore the site; remove the units and store them in the area, with hopes of a future sale; pay to have the units dismantled and shipped to their Maine-based builder, Schiavi; or leave the classrooms in place until a buyer is found.

All the options have problems, primarily due to an estimated expense of $100,000 for restoration work on the site and another $40,000 for dismantling the classrooms.

To store the units, Mason said, the district would need to find a sand pit or gravel yard where the trailers could be placed. Any storage would require the expenses of protecting the classrooms against water and animal damage, which Mason estimated at $15,000 per year.

Mason said the school district does not have the funds to cover the expenses, and would need to ask voters to approve a loan to cover costs.

Board members directed Mason and Nardelli to continue exploring options for the trailers. They wanted to get Planning Director Ken Belliveau’s opinion on how the Development Review Board may respond to keeping the classrooms on site, as well as get more specific engineering estimates on the cost of site restoration once the classrooms are removed. The School District will also explore other outlets for selling the classrooms by posting ads on craigslist, in the Observer and through realtors.

“I think we have to push every avenue,” School Board member Laura Gigliotti said.

Nardelli told the board members to expect an update in approximately two weeks.

“It is what it is. It will be a shame if school starts and the trailers are still sitting there, and I have a feeling they’re going to be,” Gigliotti said.

Around Town

Local resident elected to consulting committee

A Williston resident was one of eight people elected earlier this month to the Vermont Consultants Network’s Executive Committee for fiscal year 2010-2011.

Markey Read owns Career Networks in Williston, a career and employment development center founded in 1989 that serves Vermont and New England.

The Vermont Consultants Network, established in 1990, provides monthly forums for practicing consultants and referrals for consulting clients.

Williston man on Mobius Board

A Williston man joined mentoring nonprofit Mobius’ Board of Directors last week.

Mike Anderson is the founder and chief recreation officer of Petra Cliffs Climbing Center and Mountaineering School. Anderson will fill a resource development and event planning seat on the board.

Anderson, one of six new board members, has worked with Mobius for the past few years, providing Petra Cliffs discounts to mentor pairs.

“My energy, community involvement and business all provide a vast amount of resources that can and will support Mobius,” Anderson said in a press release.

Mobius is a local nonprofit that recruits volunteer mentors for children and provides support for mentoring programs throughout Chittenden County.

For more information, visit www.mobiusmentors.org.

Hydrant flushing may cause low water pressure

The town of Williston plans to conduct its annual hydrant flushing from July 7 through the end of August. Residents may experience low water pressure during that time.

Hydrant flushing clears sediments from the pipes and tests the water flow.

For more information, call the Williston Public Works Department at 878-1239.

Rescue service begins July 1

By Greg Duggan
Observer staff

Ever since a town ambulance service was approved with the municipal budget in March, officials have promised to launch the rescue service on July 1.

That promise now looks to come true. On Wednesday evening, after press deadline, the Williston Fire Department was scheduled to host a ribbon cutting and dedication ceremony for the new ambulance service.

“Over the past four months the Williston Fire Department has delivered as promised. And we’ll continue to do so as we move forward with our transport ambulance service,” Fire Chief Ken Morton said.

Morton said that, to ensure the service was ready by July 1, he followed a bulleted list of 50 items that each had to meet a certain deadline. Nearly each day, Morton said, he checked an item off the list.

One of the final steps came this week, when the Selectboard approved ambulance service rates at a meeting on Monday. The rates are $550 for a transport that requires advanced life support services and $450 for a transport for basic life support services. The service also carries a transportation fee of $10 per mile.

According to a memo from Town Manager Rick McGuire, the advanced life support service “often involves some form of cardiac support for the patient that might involve monitoring, defibrillation or an IV. In order to provide this service, employees are required to maintain a higher level of training than for other service levels.”

The municipal budget included nearly $232,000 for the ambulance service, though Morton has said he expects fees to cover all costs.

Williston purchased two ambulances for the rescue service — a brand new model and a used ambulance.

“The rationale for doing it is providing a better service in a more efficient manner,” McGuire said of the new service.

Ambulance service in Williston was previously provided primarily by St. Michael’s Rescue. Williston firefighters would typically be the first to arrive on the scene, and would then transfer responsibility to the responding ambulance team.

Under the new service, St. Michael’s Rescue, as well as Essex Rescue, will continue to support Williston if the town’s ambulances cannot respond to a call.

Time capsule to be opened Friday

By Stephanie Choate

Observer staff

This year’s Independence Day celebrations in Williston will include a throwback to the millennium.

On July 2, members of the Williston Historical Society are set to open a time capsule made in the year 2000 by Williston Central School students.

“Opening a time capsule made even 10 years ago gives you a real sense of how time passes,” said resident Jack Price, who served as a mentor to the students during the project. “I think the Fourth of July is a remembrance of a time in our national history and also a time to reflect on our history as a town.”

Four Williston Central School eighth grade students — Ashley Baker, Jenn Dumont, Maribeth Fonda and Melissa Tatro — made the box 10 years ago.

The students are now in their early 20s. None of them could be reached prior to press deadline.

“Talk about a time capsule, we have the kids to look at,” Price said. “They were eighth graders and now they’re out of college.”

Price said he couldn’t remember what is in the box, but guessed there would be newspapers and “fadlike” items from the time.

“We’ll all be very surprised to find out what we put in there 10 years ago,” Price said.

Price will open the box during the intermission of the town band concert Friday night, likely around 7:45 p.m.

“I think there’s going to be a lot of people with interest in what is in it and what in 10 years has changed in Williston or the state of Vermont,” Historical Society member Ginger Isham said. “There’s been a lot of change in Williston in the last 10 years.”

Isham said society members didn’t want to wait too long before opening the time capsule.

“We didn’t know how many people would still be living here and who would remember it,” Isham said.

The time capsule is currently in the Vermont Room at Dorothy Alling Memorial Library.

Price said he thinks opening the time capsule will add to the overall community feel of the celebration.

“The Fourth of July always has been one of the things that … brings new people into town together with the old timers and really makes us feel like a community,” Price said. “Having a band concert and talking about the past, the fairly recent past in this case, gets people feeling pretty neighborly and feeling pretty good about where we are.”

Allard raising money for breast cancer research

By Stephanie Choate
Observer staff

Almost every day before work, Williston resident Robin Allard walks 3 to 5 miles. On the weekends, she walks up to 10 miles.

Allard is training for the Susan G. Komen 3-Day for the Cure July 23 to 25 in Boston, where she will walk 60 miles over three days to raise money for breast cancer research. The nonprofit Susan G. Komen for the Cure has raised nearly $1.5 billion for breast cancer research, treatment and prevention since it was founded in 1982.

“Everyone has been touched by breast cancer, it seems,” Allard said. “I’m amazed at how many people are affected by this …. It’s almost like everyone you know (has been affected) one way or another.”

Allard, her sisters Kim Poirier and Tanya Cushing, and her husband Jim Bagdon, have been raising money for Allard’s participation. Each registered walker must raise $2,300.

Last weekend, Allard held a two-day yard sale at her Williston home, where she sold things from her own household, along with donations from friends, family and community members.

“We were busy all the time, even with the rain on Saturday,” she said.

Allard raised nearly $1,500 at the sale. In fact, she said the family’s fund-raising has been so successful that Cushing decided to join the walk.

“I was prepared to walk it alone,” Allard said. “Now that we’ll be walking together, it’s kind of awesome. We’re all excited.”

Poirer and Bagdon will also travel to Boston to help with the event, and are signed up as volunteers.

The family has a personal connection to breast cancer. Allard’s sister, Sharron Allard, had breast cancer and died in 1996.

Allard said preparing for the race has brought back many memories.

“We miss her,” she said. “We are reminded every day how hard it is not having her here with us.”

The family needs to raise an additional $1,000 for Cushing’s registration fee.

For more information or to donate, visit www.the3day.org and search for Robin Allard’s personal page.

Williston’s Independence Day celebrations

To avoid a conflict with Sunday church services, the town of Williston will hold its Independence Day celebrations on Saturday, July 3. The festivities begin on Thursday.

THURSDAY, JULY 1

6 p.m. – Family Bike races

Williston Community Park Field House

  • Registration begins at 6 p.m.
  • Races begin at 6:45 p.m.
  • The family-oriented races take place within the park and will include Slowest bike race, Scooter race, Kids races, Rollerblade race, Family race and Adult race.

FRIDAY, JULY 2

4 p.m. – 6 p.m. – Library book sale

Williston Central School Gym

6 p.m. – Firecracker 5K Fun Run

Williston Community Park Field House

  • · Registration begins at 4:45 p.m.
  • · Race begins at 6 p.m.
  • · Cost is $8 (includes T-shirt)
  • · Categories include Male and Female, with age groups of under 12, 12-15, 16-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50+ and family
  • · Awards will be announced and given out during the band break at the Ice Cream Social

7 p.m. – Town Band Concert, Ice Cream Social & Time capsule opening

Village Green

Join the Williston Historical Society for its annual ice cream social as the town band plays its first concert of the summer season. Additionally, the Williston Historical Society will open its time capsule during the concert. The box was made by Williston Central School students in 2000.

SATURDAY, JULY 3

9 a.m. – 2 p.m. – Library book sale

Williston Central School Gym

10 a.m. – Independence Day Parade

Route 2, Johnson’s Farm to Old Stage Road

  • Theme: “Williston: Old town charm, new town spirit”
  • Grand Marshall: Ruth Painter
  • Parade float organizer: Tony Lamb
  • Judges stand: Town Hall
  • Prizes: Best neighborhood entry, Best business entry, Best theme, Best community organization or group, Best church, Best band, Best entry with music, Best individual, Best entry with children, Judges’ favorite car, Judges’ favorite tractor, Judges’ award

10 a.m. – 2 p.m. – Rotary Silent Auction

Williston Central School cafeteria

11 a.m. – 1 p.m. – Arts and Crafts Show

Williston Central School Front Lobby

11 a.m. – 1 p.m. – Food vendors

Village Green

  • Hamburgers from Williston-Richmond Rotary
  • Hot dogs from Williston Boy Scout Troop 692
  • Popcorn from Williston Girls Softball League

11 a.m. – 2 p.m. – Fire Department Open House

Williston Fire Department

Stop by the firehouse and check out the facility.

11:15 a.m. – 1 p.m. – Federated Church Chicken Dinner

Williston Central School cafeteria

  • Eat in or take out. Tickets go on sale at 9 a.m.; $5 for children or chicken only; $9 for adults.
  • Menu: 1/2 chicken, coleslaw, rolls, cranberry sauce, cupcakes, lemonade, milk or coffee

Noon – Trinity Baptist Church Choir

The Bandstand on the Village Green

12:30 p.m. – Parade Awards Presentation

The Bandstand on the Village Green

12:35 p.m. – 1 p.m. – Children’s Games

The Village Green

1 p.m. – Frog Jumping Contest

Behind Williston Central School

7 p.m. – Musical Entertainment

Allen Brook School

  • Entertainment includes food vendors, glow necklaces, a bounce castle and more.
  • Parking will be available at Allen Brook and a shuttle bus will be operating from Williston Central School for folks traveling from the village. Please take advantage of the shuttle to eliminate the parking crunch at Allen Brook. The shuttle will begin at 7 p.m. and will continue until shortly before the fireworks begin and will begin returning shortly after the fireworks are complete.

9:30 p.m. – Fireworks

Fireworks will begin at dark.

ALL DAY

Free entrance to Lake Iroquois for Williston residents.

For more information on any of the Fourth of July activities, visit the town Web site at www.Town.Williston.vt.us or contact The Williston Parks and Recreation Department at 878-1239 or finnegank@willistontown.com.

Pieper-Lococo paces CVU at state track meet

Athletes heading to Conn. for New England meet

By Mal Boright
Observer correspondent

Observer photo by Shane Bufano Champlain Valley Union High’s Summer Spillane competes in the pole vault in the State Track and Field Meet. She placed sixth in the event.

The girls finished sixth and the boys seventh in Saturday’s Division 1 State Track and Field Meet at Burlington High School, leaving Champlain Valley Union High coach Eli Enman pleased and looking ahead to next season.

Before that, however, as many as 10 athletes will participate in the New England meet this weekend in Connecticut after qualifying at the Essex Invitational.

Enman said there were good performances by his athletes Saturday, which resulted in one first and two second place finishes. There were 18 sixth or better places for the Redhawks.

The victory went to James Pieper-Lococo in the 110 hurdles with a time of 15.96 seconds.

Pieper-Lococo was closing in on a possible win in the 300 hurdles when he crashed into the final hurdle and had to be rushed to the hospital with a fractured arm.

Observer photo by Shane Bufano James Pieper-Lococo (far left) of Champlain Valley Union High competes in the hurdles at the Division 1 State Track and Field Meet at Burlington High School on Saturday.

“He (Pieper-Lococo) had come from behind with a 100 percent effort. A hurdler next to him fell and he went down also,” Enman said.

The coach said he saw Pieper-Lococo in the hospital after the injury was operated on and said, “He was in good spirits.”

Before the spill, the CVU runner had a great day going. Along with his win in the 100 hurdles, he was sixth in the 100 dash and anchored a fourth place finish for the 100 relay team.

A second place finish in the pole vault was claimed by Sam Chevalier with a height of 12 feet even. It was the same as winner Edward Simon of Bellows Free Academy of St. Albans but Chevalier had more misses in earlier tries.

Third place in the vault went to Redhawk Josh Campagna.

Anthony Jordick was prominent with a fifth in the 400 run plus roles in the fourth place marks by the 100 and 400 relay teams.

Best finish among the girls was by Haleigh Smith with a second in the triple jump. She also captured a fourth in the long jump and anchored the 100 relay team’s fifth place.

It was also a busy day for Summer Spillane, who ran to fourth place finishes in the 1,500 and 3,000 tours, led a sixth place effort by the 800 relay team and notched a sixth in the pole vault.

The numbers going to the New Englands would be nine or 10 depending on whether Enman will be allowed to name a replacement for the injured Pieper-Lococo on the relay team, which was qualified for the trip.

Enman said several members of his relatively youthful team were close to qualifying for the finals and, while a few solid performers will be lost to graduation, the overall prospects for next year look very good.

CVU tennis team out to defend title

Mal Boright
Observer correspondent

Only third-seeded Burlington High (15-1) and Vermont individual champion Madison Hartley of Charlotte stand between the Champlain Valley Union High girls tennis team and a second straight Division 1 championship.

The Redhawks and Seahorses will meet to decide the issue at 3 p.m. Thursday on the courts in Shelburne.

CVU earned the appearance in the finals Tuesday with a home victory over fifth-seeded South Burlington High, 5-2. Burlington popped seventh-seeded Rice Memorial High, 6-1 at Leddy Park.

The Redhawks’ number one player, senior Kylie deGroot, set the stage for the defeat of South Burlington with a tough 4-6, 7-5, 6-1 victory over the Rebels’ Samantha Wulfson.

CVU’s AnnaClare Smith breezed to 6-0 and 6-1 sets over South Burlington’s Anna Young while Colleen McCarthy and Andrea Joseph also earned wins for the Redhawks.

The duo of Kristen Donalson and Christina Parker triumphed in doubles.

CVU’s boys team was knocked out of its Division 1 tournament last Thursday, 6-1, by South Burlington. Liam Kelley had the Redhawks’ lone win.