July 25, 2014

Photos:CVU boys hockey

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Photos by Al Frey

Photos by Al Frey

CVU Men's Hockey_201 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_208 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_219 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_279 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_296 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_300 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_311 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_325 12-7-Bulla CVU Men's Hockey_330 12-7 CVU Men's Hockey_353 12-7 Bulla

Christmas Services

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The following listings are for Christmas and are in addition to any regular weekend services:

Ascension Lutheran Church

Holy Communion and Christmas Pageant (Dec. 15), 10 a.m.

Christmas Eve Service, 6 and 9:30 p.m.

Christmas Day Service, 10 a.m.

Christ Memorial Church

Christmas Eve Service, 7 p.m.

Community Alliance Church

Christmas Eve Service, 5 p.m.

Community Lutheran Church

Christmas Eve, 4 and 8 p.m.

Christmas Day Service, 11a.m.

First Baptist Church

Dec. 15, Christmas Caroling, 3 p.m.

Family Christmas Eve Service. 6 p.m.

Traditional Candlelight Service. 11 p.m.

Good Shepard Lutheran Church

Yuletide Carol Sing-a-long (Dec. 21), 7 p.m.

Family Christmas Eve Service, 4:30 p.m.

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service, 9 p.m.

Holiday brunch after service (Dec. 29), 10:30 a.m.

Immaculate Heart of Mary

Christmas Eve Mass, 6 p.m., midnight

Christmas Morning Mass, 10:30 a.m.

Jericho Congregational Church

Lessons and Carols (Dec. 22), 8 a.m. and 11 a.m.

Christmas Eve Pageant, 6 p.m.

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service, 9 p.m.

Christmas Day service, 7 a.m., pajamas welcome.

Old Brick Church

Community Christmas Eve service, 11 p.m. Scripture readings and song with candle lighting for all. All are invited.

Living Hope Christian Church

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service, 7 p.m.

Richmond Congregational Church

Christmas Eve Family Service, 5:30 p.m.

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service, 8 p.m.

St. Jude and Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Christmas Eve, 4 p.m. at the Old Lantern in Charlotte, 7 p.m. at St. Jude, 10 p.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Christmas Morning Mass, 10 a.m. at St. Jude

New Year’s Eve, 4 p.m. at St. Jude

New Year’s Day, 10:00 a.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel

United Church of Hinesburg

Christmas Pageant and worship, Dec. 15, 10 a.m.

Candlelight Christmas Eve services, 6 p.m. (no choir) and 10 p.m.

Trinity Baptist Church

Annual Kids Christmas Program (Dec. 19), 7 p.m.

Christmas concert (Dec. 22), 6 p.m.

Christmas Eve Service, 7 p.m.

New Year’s Eve Service, 7 p.m.

Williston Federated Church

Worship Service and Christmas Pageant (Dec. 15), 9:30 a.m.

Christmas Eve Family Service, 5 p.m.

Christmas Eve Candlelit Service, 7:30 p.m.

Everyday Gourmet: Hostess hat trick

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by Kim Dannies

With guests coming and going, planning meals that feel special can be pretty challenging this time of year. To really score with your crowd, consider this menu of shrimp scampi, harvest salad and almond macaroons. Much of it can be prepped ahead, and it pulls together beautifully with bread and wine for a festive evening.

 

Harvest salad

Do ahead: combine 1 cup of walnuts with 1 tablespoon maple syrup. Bake at 350 for 25 minutes. Cool. Shred 1 cup Cabot cheddar cheese. Dressing: combine 1/2 cup olive oil, 1/4 cup sherry vinegar, 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard, pinch of S&P. Shake until thickened.

Compose the salad: add 8 handfuls of fresh arugula to a salad bowl. Add some nuts, the cheese, and a diced apple. Toss to mix in dressing. Serves 6.

 

Ina Garten’s shrimp scampi   

Make garlic butter one day ahead. In a small bowl, mash 12 tablespoons softened butter with 4 cloves minced garlic, 1/4 cup minced shallots, 3 tablespoons minced parsley; 1 teaspoon minced rosemary, 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes, 1 teaspoon lemon zest, 2 tablespoons lemon juice, 1 large egg yolk, 2/3 cup panko, a pinch of salt and pepper each.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Peel, devein and butterfly 2 pounds (12-15) shrimp in the shell, leaving the tails on. Place the shrimp in a bowl and toss gently with 3 tablespoons olive oil, 2 tablespoons white wine, 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Starting from the outer edge of a 14-inch oval gratin dish, arrange the shrimp in a single layer cut side down with the tails curling up and towards the center of the dish. Top shrimp with garlic butter. Bake for 10-12 minutes until hot and bubbly.

 

Boom-Boom’s almond macaroons

These freeze beautifully. Mix together 14 ounces of sweetened coconut, 14 ounces of unsweetened coconut, 1 14-ounce can of non-fat condensed milk, 1/4 teaspoon of almond and vanilla extract, each and 1 cup toasted chopped almonds. Mix well and shape into 20 “Hershey kiss” shapes. Place on a cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes. Microwave 2 cups of chocolate chips for 45 seconds, stir in 2 teaspoons of canola oil. On a fresh cookie sheet lined with parchment paper, drop a teaspoon of chocolate into a pool and set a macaroon on it. Drizzle a little chocolate over each top.

Kim Dannies is a graduate of La Varenne Cooking School in France. She lives in Williston with her husband, Jeff; they have three twenty-something daughters. Archived Everyday Gourmet columns are at kimdannies.com. [email protected]

 

Historical Society sets annual meeting

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Adam Boyce

Adam Boyce

The Williston Historical Society will hold its annual meeting and program on Jan. 11 at 1 p.m. in the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library.

The program will feature Adam Boyce as “The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer.” Taggart grew up in Topsham, going on to perform in various stage shows across the country for over 40 years, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in “The Jazz Singer.” Boyce portrays Taggart near the end of his career, c. 1936, sharing recollections on his life, with some live fiddling and humorous sketches.

The business meeting will include an election of officers, a bylaw change proposal and more. The Vermont room will be open to view Williston historic artifacts such as the Munson Clock and music box. The meeting is open to the public. Join the society for dessert sampling after the presentation.

Joseph S. Cilley: Honored 45 years after he left Williston

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Joseph C. Cilley was principal of the Williston Academy from 1858 to 1868. (Photo courtesy of the Williston Historical Society).

Joseph C. Cilley was principal of the Williston Academy from 1858 to 1868. (Photo courtesy of the Williston Historical Society).

By Richard H. Allen

Special to the Observer

The 1913 community celebration of Williston’s 1763 charter included a “reunion of the alumni of J. S. Cilley’s school.” This was actually the Williston Academy, and Mr. Cilley had been a beloved principal there. Why would they hold such an event 45 years after he left town? What was it about Cilley that made people remember him so fondly?

The 1913 Williston school reunion started with literary exercises on the grounds of the Root homestead, probably a reference to the present 7979 Williston Road house (Slate Barn Antiques). The banquet, scheduled for 5 p.m., did not begin until 6 p.m., perhaps due to the logistics of getting the estimated 525 graduates and friends moved to the basement of the Federated Church for a seven-course dinner. The guest of honor was Mrs. Edmund Whitney (formerly Miss Seaton), one of Cilley’s assistants. She received a standing ovation.

Cilley was born in Hopkinton, N.H. in 1815. His family moved to Jericho, and he worked on the farm. He was self-educated, studying at night to tackle algebra, geometry, Latin and Greek. He taught in Ohio for a short time, then returned to Vermont.

His Vermont teaching career started in Underhill and in 1853 he moved to Underhill Center, where he was principal of the brand new Green Mountain Academy; the building still stands behind the St. Thomas Catholic Church.

Cilley’s years in Underhill were remembered in the Vermont Historical Gazetteer magazine. Cilley “…has done more for the educational interest of the town than any other man. Truly an earnest, devoted, successful teacher, and a noble man. In all the states from Maine to California, are his pupils to be found. Many thousands remember him with affectionate gratitude and esteem. [He] lately received an honorary degree of A. M. from UVM. With no aids save text books and his vigorous mind, he has excelled those with the greatest advantages.”

Cilley moved to Williston in 1858 to become principal of the Williston Academy that had just undergone repairs and refurbishment by townsfolk in an attempt to make it more attractive to students.

Had they also taken this on to draw in a rising educational star like Cilley? The Academy was located approximately where the armory stands today.

In November of 1858, a Burlington Free Press notice for the school set the tone for what Cilley expected from the students. “The conditions of membership in this School are correctness of deportment, diligence and thoroughness in study, and obedience to law,” it read.

In 1861, pupils could study common English, higher English, Latin, Greek and French. Music, with the use of a piano, was the most expensive course at $10 tuition per term. Board cost $1.50 a week. If fuel and washing were included the cost rose to $2.

Eventually, in 1862, Cilley purchased a house in Williston, now 8420 Williston Road, the present home of Ken and Ginger Morton. In February of 1869, after he had left Williston, Cilley was open to either renting or selling the house. He had some trouble moving the property, for later in 1870 it was still up for sale with this Burlington Free Press notice: “For Sale at a Bargain. One of the most desirable places in Williston Village, owned and formerly occupied by J. S. Cilley. Four acres of excellent land, good supply of shade and Fruit trees, good Barn, House pleasant and very convenient. Fences and Buildings all in good repair. Also a quantity of wood, four to five tons of hay, cutter, wagon, and a good covered carriage.” It was eventually sold in September of 1870.

After ten years of residing in Williston, Cilley once again moved on, this time to Brandon where the school there had been remodeled for $18,000 from three to two stories, resulting in rooms with high ceilings. Cilley was attracted by renovated facilities that proved a community’s commitment to education. He stayed there until 1880. A plaque placed in his honor in 1920 lauded his “profound scholarship, his high ideals, his unselfish service to the youth of Brandon.”

A Vermonter magazine article by E. S. Marsh depicted Cilley as a “strict disciplinarian, [who] insisted upon observance of the rules, and carried his oversight of his scholars beyond the school walls and the school hours. His interest in them never flagged, and his care for their mental and moral welfare was earnest and unceasing.”

Williston Academy, started in 1828 by Reverend Peter Chase, had pupils enrolled from other towns and neighboring states, as well as locals. The ten years under Cilley’s administration are often cited as the apex of its reputation. Besides the Academy, the village was advertised as a great place to live. An 1866 school catalog describes Williston as a “pleasant and quiet village…in regard to health, the place is very desirable…entirely free from haunts of idleness and dissipation, and the location is…favorable to good order, to mental improvement, and moral culture.”

Schools like the Williston Academy were not uncommon in Chittenden County in the 19th century. Underhill had two of them. There was also the Hinesburgh Academy, the Female Seminary in Charlotte and the Essex Classical Institute in Essex Center. The competition for students called for frequent advertising in the local newspapers, as well as laudatory articles. The standing of the school often hinged on the headmaster’s reputation as an inspiring educator. So it was a bold stroke for some of the citizens of Williston to improve the physical structure of the Academy and hire Cilley to oversee the transformation into a well-regarded institution.

Cilley established a solid reputation for Williston and the Academy as a place for a rigorous education under the guidance of an esteemed and admired educator. The Reverend A. D. Barber of Williston said of Cilley, upon his death in 1898, he “always used his teachership as a sacred trust, a high commission from Heaven.”

Richard Allen is a local historian and author. He has written a series of articles for Williston’s 250th anniversary. His research is supported by the Williston Historical Society.

 

Police notes

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Child left in car

Police received a report on Dec. 3 that a woman had again left her baby in her car and that she “leaves her baby in the car while she shops”—in one instance leaving the baby in the car for 45 minutes, according to police reports. Police spoke to the mother, according to the report.

Driving under the influence

Andrew Weiss, 44, of Manchester, N.H. was cited on a charge of driving under the influence-third offense on Nov. 25, according to police reports. His blood alcohol concentration was .111, the report notes. The legal limit for driving in Vermont is .08. He was cited to appear in court.

Theft

On Nov. 26, police received a report that someone stole six propane tanks from the Jiffy Mart on Essex Road after cutting off two locks to the “tank cage,” according to police reports. The case is under investigation.

Jenny Mohajer, 33, of Essex was cited on a charge of retail theft from Walmart on Dec. 7, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Leaving scene of accident

Joshua Russin, 30, of Richmond was cited on a charge of leaving the scene of an accident on Nov. 28, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Multiple charges

Botir Kosimov, 32, of Shelburne was cited on charges of driving with a suspended license and violation of conditions of release on Nov. 26, according to police reports.

James Dewolfe, 46, of St. Johnsbury was arrested on Nov. 29 and taken into custody on two escape warrants, as well as being cited on charges of resisting arrest and assault on a police officer, according to police reports. He was lodged at Chittenden County Correctional Facility, the report notes.

Kyle Cushing, 25, of Burlington was cited on charges of driving with a suspended license and violation of conditions of release on Nov. 30, according to police reports.

Robert E. Sheridan, 45, of Hinesburg was cited on charges of driving with a suspended license and violation of conditions of release on Nov. 26, according to police reports. He was cited to appear in court on Jan. 7.

Christina M. Quintin, 29, of Essex Junction was cited on charges of driving with a suspended license and violation of conditions of release on Nov. 25, according to police reports. She was cited to appear in court on Jan. 7.

Vandalism

Police are investigating a report regarding water being put into the gas tank of a vehicle parked at Majestic 10 on Dec. 2, according to police reports.

A North Williston Road resident reported to police on Dec. 8 that someone “ran over her mailbox sometime over night,” according to police reports. There were parts of the vehicle’s headlight on her lawn, the report notes. No other information was released.

Lewd conduct

Thomas Carr, 55, of Litchfield, N.H. was lodged at the Chittenden County Correctional Facility on Dec. 2 on charges of lewd and lascivious conduct and unlawful restraint after allegedly trying to trap a woman in her room at the Town Place Suites in Williston, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Driving with suspended license

Jeffery Rotax, 42, of Hinesburg was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Nov. 25, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Ryan McKenzie, 28, of Colchester was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Nov. 26, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Kurtis Thibault, 24, of South Burlington was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Nov. 29, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Grant Drinkwater, 57, of Essex was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Dec. 2, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Ty Cobb, 52, of Georgia was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Dec. 4, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Ryan Lamothe, 34, of South Burlington was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Dec. 6, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Michael Richer, 23, of Essex was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Dec. 7, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Police notes are written based on information provided by the Williston Police Department and the Vermont State Police. Please note that all parties are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

 

Harwood next for Reb-Hawks hockey

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Molly Dunphy takes a shot on goal during the Dec. 4 opening hockey game. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

Molly Dunphy takes a shot on goal during the Dec. 4 opening hockey game. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

The newly cooperative Champlain Valley Union-South Burlington High girls hockey team took a 1-1 mark into Wednesday’s home clash with Spaulding High at Cairns Arena.

The Reb-Hawks return to the ice Saturday with a trip to meet Harwood Union High at 6 p.m. at the Ice Center of Washington County.

On Monday, their initial road trip of the season to Manchester—postponed from last Saturday—resulted in a 3-1 stinger by Burr and Burton Academy.

Kyla Driver of the Reb-Hawks scored the first goal of the game but the CVU-SBHS combine was unable to score again and the Bulldogs were able to get three pucks past goalie Courtney Peyko who made 28 saves.

In their season opener a week ago Wednesday, the Reb-Hawks rapped Rice Memorial 7-3 at Cairns.

CVU veterans Molly Dunphy and Rachel Pitcher scored for the winners, Dunphy popping two goals.

Courtney Barrett and and Sarah Fisher each added two tallies and two assists for the winners.

—Mal Boright, Observer correspondent

 

Winter teams at a glance

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December 12th, 2013 [Read more...]

On the ice: Alex Bulla

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After a successful football season, Alex Bulla—shown playing in the Dec. 7 game—is turning his attention to his favorite sport: hockey. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

After a successful football season, Alex Bulla—shown playing in the Dec. 7 game—is turning his attention to his favorite sport: hockey. (Observer photo by Al Frey)

The annual switch from tackling to checking

By Mal Boright

Observer correspondent

December 12th, 2013 [Read more...]

On the court: Kaelyn Kohlasch

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Kaelyn Kohlasch (right) is set to begin her third varsity basketball campaign after helping the CVU girls soccer team to a Division 1 championship. (Observer file photo)

Kaelyn Kohlasch (right) is set to begin her third varsity basketball campaign after helping the CVU girls soccer team to a Division 1 championship. (Observer file photo)

Senior looks forward to third varsity hoop campaign 

By Mal Boright

Observer correspondent

December 12th, 2013 [Read more...]