October 20, 2014

Around Town

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POLICE RECEIVE GRANT

The Williston Police Department is among 31 law enforcement agencies to receive funding for bulletproof vests under the Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program.

Williston will receive $1,333.51 to put toward six vests. Richmond will receive $591.44.

The Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Program provides matching federal grants to state and local authorities for the purchase of bulletproof vests. The program, established in 1998 through bipartisan legislation coauthored by Sen. Patrick Leahy, has helped to provide more than one million bulletproof vests to law enforcement officers across the country, including more than 4,000 vests for Vermont officers. The grants will help offices in Vermont purchase more than 271 new vests.

NEFCU collecting socks for the homeless

New England Federal Credit Union and Community Health Centers of Burlington will kick off their second annual Sock Drop on Nov. 1. The Sock Drop’s mission is to provide warm socks for CHCB’s patients and the homeless during Vermont’s long, cold winters.

“Many patients and homeless people need this critical winter clothing item,” said Kim Anderson, CHCB development program manager. “It’s hard to overstate the importance of warm, healthy feet at this time of year.”

Donations of new, warm socks in adult sizes are being accepted at CHCB’s Riverside Avenue location and at the following NEFCU locations: 141 Harvest Lane in Williston; 74 Pearl Street in Essex; 764 Shelburne Road in South Burlington; 150 Water Tower Circle in Colchester; and 172 South Main Street in St. Albans.

CSSU Hurricanes signups scheduled

Signups for the Chittenden South Supervisory Union Hurricanes wrestling program are set for Nov. 19 from 6:20 to 7:30 p.m. in the cafeteria of Hinesburg Community School.

Wrestlers in the program—open to all seventh and eighth graders in the CSSU district— compete in local tournaments against other teams on Saturdays, with some dual meets in the evenings. The team practices Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. The program is free, and all gear is provided.

Kindergarten through sixth grade signups are set for Jan. 14.

For more information, contact the head coach Wayne Ring at [email protected] or call 482-3747.

UVM team trades playing field for farm field

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Mike Isham (right) addresses the UVM men’s lacrosse team, which spend a recent day working on his Williston farm instead of practicing on the lacrosse field. (Observer courtesy photo)

Mike Isham (right) addresses the UVM men’s lacrosse team, which spend a recent day working on his Williston farm instead of practicing on the lacrosse field. (Observer courtesy photo)

By Matt Sutkoski

Observer correspondent

Every athlete knows it’s a good idea to cross train, to do some exercises that aren’t part of the usual routine.

With that in mind, the 41 members of the University of Vermont men’s lacrosse team and their three coaches recently spent part of a day toiling on the Isham farm in Williston.

Instead of the usual routine of finessing their moves on the lacrosse field, the men prepared the greenhouse for winter, stacked four cords of wood, cleaned up and prepared the blackberry patch for winter, built a fire pit, moved heavy equipment in the sugarhouse and landscape boulders on the property.

The work at the Isham farm was a new twist on the lacrosse team’s tradition of community service, said coach Ryan Curtis of Williston. Team members have long raised money for the Dana Farber Cancer Institute through activities such as exhibition games, but Curtis said he thought it would be nice to do something different.

“We are always looking to do things locally,” he said.

The team approach to Isham farm work had its genesis when, earlier this autumn, Curtis helped chaperone his son Dylan’s preschool class trip to the Isham farm.

Curtis said he got to talking with farm owner Mike Isham and it dawned on him a work day would be a perfect community service activity for his lacrosse team.

So he canceled practice one mid-October day and had the team “work out” at the Isham farm.

The unconventional team “practice” at the Isham farm turned out to be a good idea, Curtis said. “It was a nice change of pace,” he said. “I heard a lot of comments that ‘I could do this every day,’” he said.

Farm co-owner Mike Isham said he appreciated the help. Autumn is a busy time of year, as the farm is buttoning up for the winter. The iconic former dairy farm on Oak Hill Road has been in the Isham family for five generations, ever since Jarius David Isham bought the property in 1871.

It’s more economical for many farmers nowadays to diversify, so Isham is putting the finishing touches on a barn renovation that has become a venue for weddings, parties and gatherings rather than a place to stash feed or shelter cattle.

It’s also a place for people to pick berries, buy produce, check out the sugarhouse in early spring and explore the nature trails. All that stuff needs maintenance, and preparation for the changing seasons.

The invasion of young, fit lacrosse players at the farm was perfect, said Isham, 53. He particularly appreciated the heavy lifting, because Isham said it’s a little harder for him to move things around than it used to be. “It was nice having strong backs around,” he said.

Isham said the lacrosse team pretty much acted as, well, a team, seeming to instinctively know who needed help when, and which task needed to be completed first. “They were all really enthusiastic,” Isham said.

After two hours of work, the lacrosse team was finished, and Isham, who had been behind in his fall chores, found himself caught up. “I work 100 hours a week and they saved me more than 80 hours of work, just about a week’s worth,” Isham said.

Andrew Buckanavage, a member of the lacrosse team said he liked the sense of accomplishment he got out of the day.

“The most rewarding part of the experience was when we realized how long it would have taken Farmer Isham to do all this alone, if he could even manage that,” Buckanavage said. “My group was tasked with moving an evaporator and sugaring bin. Not only did it take five of us to move this bin, but we had to re-adjust railings and move other equipment to make it fit, something that seemed impossible at first, even with the five of us.”

Buckanavage said he also liked the exposure to farm life, such as the moment Isham explained how the maple sugaring operation worked and the bedlam when the roosters came running at feeding time.

Curtis said the whole experience was so much fun the lacrosse team might do it again next year. Isham said he’d be ready to welcome them with open arms.

School board holds final bond hearing

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By Mal Boright 

Observer correspondent

October 31, 2013 [Read more...]

“Captain Phillips” Commands your Attention

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3.5_popcorns

 

By Michael S. Goldberger

Special to the Observer

October 24th, 2013 [Read more...]

PHOTOS: CVU Football

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CVU-Football_023-19Oct13 CVU-Football_040-19Oct13 CVU-Football_045-19Oct13 CVU-Football_064-19Oct13

photos by Al Frey

photos by Al Frey

CVU-Football_087-19Oct13 CVU-Football_098-19Oct13

Recipe Corner: Orange vegetable soups

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By Ginger Isham

October 24th, 2013

[Read more...]

Police Notes

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Drug take-back day

On Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., police officers at 57 locations across Vermont, including the Williston state police barracks and Williston Police Department, will be prepared to accept unused or unwanted prescription medications. Pills should not be flushed or thrown away but instead brought to a location for proper disposal. No identification or questions are asked.

The Williston Police Department will accept prescription pills in the Shaw’s parking lot. Anyone with questions can call Sgt. Justin Huizenga at 878-6611 or visit vsp.vermont.gov/drugtakeback

Driving under the influence

David L. Trombley, 59, of Cabot was cited on a charge of driving under the influence-second offense on Oct. 4, according to police reports. His blood alcohol concentration was .114, the report notes. The legal limit for driving in Vermont is .08. He was cited to appear in court.

Benjamin C. Lau, 23, of Burlington was cited on a charge of driving under the influence on Oct. 5, according to police reports. His blood alcohol concentration was .105, the report notes. He was cited to appear in court.

Robert H. Jordan, 37, of Rochester was cited on a charge of driving under the influence on Oct. 5, according to police reports. His blood alcohol concentration was .143, the report notes. He was lodged at Chittenden County Correctional Center “for detox,” and cited to appear in court.

Burglary suspect arrested

Williston Police arrested Allen Robertson, 20, of Winooski on Oct. 9 after an investigation regarding daytime burglaries that occurred on Sept. 29 and Oct. 7. At the time of Robertson’s arrest, police say he had two bags of heroin in his possession.

Robertson was subsequently charged with four counts of burglary and one count of possession of regulated drugs, according to police. Some of the stolen property was recovered, according to police reports. Police are still investigating other unsolved daytime burglaries and the whereabouts of other stolen property. Anyone with information is asked to call Williston Police at 878 6611.

Driving with license suspended

Lisa M. Winn, 44, of Burlington was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Sept. 24, according to police reports. She was cited to appear in court.

Leon Corbitt III, 41, of Burlington was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Sept. 25, according to police reports. He was cited to appear in court.

Harold P. Cross Jr., 51, of Winooski was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Oct. 2, according to police reports. He was cited to appear in court.

Maryjo Curry, 45, of Essex Junction was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license-criminal on Oct. 3, according to police reports.

Anna C. Clark, 29, of Winooski was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Oct. 7, according to police reports. She was cited to appear in court on Nov. 5.

Thomas C. Adams, 35, of Williston was cited on a charge of driving with a suspended license on Oct. 18, according to police reports. He was cited to appear in court on Dec. 5.

Police notes are written based on information provided by the Williston Police Department and the Vermont State Police. Please note that all parties are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

Smarter teen driving starts with parents

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October 24th, 2013

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Rebels return to CVU for field hockey quarterfinal

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State meet at Thetford next for CVU harriers

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October 24th, 2013 [Read more...]