October 23, 2014

Taft Corners offers community garden (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

A new community garden has opened in Taft Corners this spring, and a few plots are still available to interested gardeners.

The Taft Corners Community Garden is sponsored by Gardener’s Supply Co. and organized by employee Debbie Page. She said the garden would not have been possible without help from Jeff Davis of Taft Corners Associates, who’s allowing the use of the property for the purpose of the garden.

Page said Tuesday there are 10 plots at the garden, with four still available for anyone who is interested. The plots are 10 feet by 24 feet and cost $30 for the season.

A generous gardener has already paid for an extra plot, Page added. There will also be eight raised beds, where vegetables will be grown and donated to area food shelves, including the Williston Community Food Shelf, Page said.

If interested in acquiring a plot, contact Gardener’s Supply Co. at 879-0099.

— Tim Simard, Observer correspondent

 

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Sales tax shows surprising upturn (5/21/09)

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Revenue for local levy rises by 3.8 percent

May 21, 2009

By Greg Elias

Observer staff

Sales tax revenue rebounded in the first quarter of 2009, raising hopes that a two-year slump for a levy that funds much of the municipal budget may be ending.

The 1 percent local option tax brought in $487,084 for the three-month period ending March 31. That’s a 3.8 percent increase from the same quarter a year ago.

The surprising turnaround came after sales tax revenue dropped in seven of the previous eight quarters. And it happened amid the biggest economic downturn in decades.

Town Manager Rick McGuire expressed guarded optimism about the latest sales tax numbers. Williston relies heavily on the tax, which provides about 30 percent of the town’s revenue.

“I don’t see a reversal where it starts going up dramatically,” he said. “But maybe there will be a leveling off.”

Williston started collecting the local option tax, which piggybacks on the state’s 6 percent sales tax, six years ago. Revenue increased in each of the first four years of the tax, but then began dropping after the state imposed new rules on the levy in January 2007. Among the changes was a provision that no longer allows the town to collect tax on items bought in Williston but shipped elsewhere.

Revenue over the next two years fell 22 percent. The latest three-month period marked only the second same-quarter increase since the rule changes.

The upturn in local sales tax revenue seems counterintuitive given the economy. The state faces huge budget shortfalls due to reduced revenue from all sources, including the sales tax.

The national economy is also bleeding jobs and bankrupting companies, although recent positive news on consumer spending, unemployment claims and housing prices have some speculating that a turnaround is in store.

Art Woolf, an associate professor of economics at the University of Vermont, said it is impossible to identify a trend with the local sales tax numbers until at least two more quarters show similarly improved revenue.

The most recent figures may be more of an indicator of local retail trends than evidence the economy is rebounding, Woolf said. He noted that Williston, home of several national retailers including Wal-Mart, may simply have become a destination for more faraway shoppers trying to pinch pennies.

“When times are tough, people are willing to drive further for a bargain,” Woolf said.

As for the national economy, he said the picture is also murky.

“Maybe we’re seeing the beginning of the end of the downturn, or maybe we’re seeing a false spring,” he said.

McGuire said he is worried that the latest quarter’s numbers may not yet fully reflect two troubling developments: The bankruptcy of Circuit City, whose Williston outlet was still open for part of the first quarter before finally shutting its doors for good; and increased competition for the town’s Home Depot store from a pair of new Lowe’s outlets in nearby Essex Junction and South Burlington.

Still, the new sales tax numbers put the town on track to meet revenue projections for the fiscal year ending June 30, McGuire said. The town had estimated it would receive $450,000 for the fiscal year’s third quarter, a figure exceeded by $37,000.

Williston now needs only to slightly exceed the projected $620,000 for the quarter ending in June to meet the yearly revenue estimate and avoid dipping into shrinking reserves to balance the municipal budget.

 

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Spring is time to plant a row for the hungry (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Tim Simard

Observer staff

With warmer days and bountiful sunshine in the forecast, now is the time many local residents will begin planting their garden in anticipation of a strong growing season. As they do so, the Williston Observer’s Plant a Row for the Hungry program is asking gardeners to think about planting extra vegetables for area food shelves.

 


    Observer photo by Greg Duggan
Judy Geissler pins burlap sacks in the ground to prevent weeds from growing around the beanpoles at the Williston Community Garden on Tuesday evening. Geissler is a member of the Master Gardener program, which donates produce from the garden to the Williston Plant a Row efforts.

 


    Observer photo by Greg Duggan
Gardening tools lay at the edge of the Williston Community Garden on Tuesday evening.

This year, the campaign is adding a second delivery day each week to bring fruits and vegetables to local food shelves. Deliveries will take place Wednesdays and Fridays at 9 a.m. The Observer will accept donations of produce Monday through Thursday.

In the past, Plant a Row has donated thousands of pounds of fresh produce to the Hinesburg Food Shelf and the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf in Burlington. This year, the program will turn its focus to the Williston Community Food Shelf, which opened its doors at the tail end of last year’s growing season.

Marianne Apfelbaum, publisher of the Observer, is urging all local growers to plant an extra row this season to help out the area food shelves.

“We are very excited to be able to provide fresh produce this year to needy families right in our own community, as well as to continue to support the Hinesburg and Burlington food shelves as food donations permit,” Apfelbaum said.

Williston’s Plant a Row program began three years ago, modeling itself after the nationwide Plant a Row for the Hungry program created by the Garden Writers Association.

The new delivery schedule reflects the three days a week when the Williston Community Food Shelf is open. The Plant a Row program expects to make two deliveries per week to make sure the Food Shelf receives the freshest produce.

“We don’t want it to sit on our shelves and spoil,” said Cathy Michaels, a board member with the Williston Community Food Shelf.

Michaels said this would be the first time the Food Shelf will be able to offer fresh vegetables. Last year, when the organization opened in Maple Tree Place in November, it briefly offered late season apples.

“We haven’t ever been open this time of year,” Michaels said. “It’ll be a nice surprise for them.”

A regional need

The Williston Community Food Shelf will receive the bulk of Plant a Row donations, Apfelbaum said. The Hinesburg Food Shelf and the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf will receive the excess donations, she added.

Hinesburg Food Shelf coordinator Doug Gunnerson hopes his organization will still receive a good amount of produce.

“It’ll affect us for sure,” Gunnerson said. “It’ll be quite a bit from them that we’re not going to get anymore.”

Gunnerson said there were a few local Hinesburg gardeners who donated items last year and he hopes there might be more this season. He said fresh produce is always a popular item at the Hinesburg Food Shelf, which is open once a week on Friday mornings.

Last year, more than 1,200 pounds were donated to the food shelves in Hinesburg and Burlington. That total was down about 1,000 pounds from 2007, yet still drew the same number of participants. Local growers have said the 2008 growing season was a difficult one due to excessive rainfall. This year the Observer has set a goal of collecting 1,500 pounds of produce.

June Jones, a member of the Master Gardeners, said the heavy rains last May and June spoiled many early season vegetables. High humidity also caused fungus problems on tomato plants. This year, the gardeners planned to leave more space between plants to allow for better air filtration and less chance for spoilage.

“People were packing them all too tightly into the plots, which isn’t necessarily something you want to do,” Jones said.

The Master Gardeners are a volunteer group that promotes successful and environmentally friendly gardening. The group maintains a plot at the Williston Community Garden, and has contributed to the Observer’s Plant a Row program since its inception.

The Master Gardeners began their planting season on Tuesday evening at the Williston Community Garden at Brennan Woods, the day after what Jones hoped would be the spring’s final frost.

For more information on the Plant a Row program, contact Kelly Walters at the Williston Observer at 872-9000, x19.

 

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Roadwork ahead, but without stimulus money (5/21/09)

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Projects fail to qualify for federal funding

May 21, 2009

By Greg Elias

Observer staff

The town of Williston will embark on an ambitious $249,000 paving program this year. But local taxpayers will pick up the entire tab because state rules disqualified smaller projects from receiving federal stimulus money.

Nine roads will be paved. The town awarded the contract to ST Paving Inc. of Waterbury, which submitted the low bid of $62.62 per ton of asphalt.

Williston applied for but did not receive funding for some of the paving projects through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also known as the federal stimulus package. The state of Vermont had $125 million in stimulus money to spend for road and bridge work.

Rules governing how the money was allocated, which were put in place by the Agency of Transportation in consultation with the legislature, limited eligibility to projects costing more than $300,000, said AOT spokesman John Zicconi. The state imposed the rule largely because of high administrative costs associated with federally funded highway work.

“There’s just a lot of strings that come with federal money,” he said. “So if a project does not cost enough, you end up wasting a lot of money on things not related to paving.”

Zicconi added that there was not enough stimulus funding to pay for all the proposed paving projects, so the state tried to ensure its choices represented the most cost-effective use of money.

Williston Public Works Director Neil Boyden said he was not surprised the town’s projects were considered too small for stimulus money. He said “horrendous” federal rules can render more modest road projects cost prohibitive.

“I’m a little disappointed, yes,” he said. “But I’ve worked on enough federal projects before to know it is unbelievable the amount of paperwork.”

The town applied for $611,000 in stimulus money to fund paving work. The money would have paid for fresh asphalt on Marshall Avenue as well as Oak Hill and Old Stage roads.

Funding for this year’s paving projects will now be split between the current fiscal year’s budget and the 2009-2010 budget, Boyden said.

The town saved money by delaying some of the previously planned paving work until this year, Boyden said. Prices for oil, a major component of asphalt, skyrocketed last year, driving up the cost of paving. Oil prices have since fallen, bringing lower paving prices.

Plans call for paving stretches ranging from a quarter-mile to a half-mile long on Marshall Avenue, Redmond Road, Metcalf Drive, Lyman Drive, Mountain View Road, Industrial Avenue, South Brownell Road, Maple Road and Blair Park Road.

Though it is impossible to determine a precise schedule because of uncertain weather, Boyden said work will probably begin no later than the end of May and continue into the summer.

Marshall Avenue, Redmond Road and Mountain View Road will be the first to receive fresh asphalt, he said. Some preparation work on Metcalf and Lyman drives as well as Maple and Blair Park roads will take place before paving begins.

Paving plans

The following roads are slated for paving this spring and summer:

•    Blair Park Road, including Eagle Crest loop

•    Industrial Avenue, from the bridge to Vermont 2A

•    Lyman Drive

•    Maple Road

•    Marshall Avenue, from Leroy Road to South Burlington town line

•    Metcalf Drive, north and south sections

•    Mountain View Road, from Old Stage Road to Ledgewood Drive

•    Redmond Road, from IBM entrance to sandpit

•    South Brownell Road, from Sucker Brook southward

 

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Town turns down chance to buy land (5/21/09)

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Property mulled for community center

May 21, 2009

By Greg Elias

Observer staff

The Selectboard on Monday declined to buy land that an advisory group said the town should consider for a community center.

The 7-acre parcel, located across from the police station off U.S. 2 in Williston Village, is owned by John and Heather Remy. A homebuilder offered the couple $525,000, but the town had the right to match any offer for the land, which borders the recreation fields behind Williston Central School.

The Selectboard first discussed the purchase earlier this month but delayed a decision until various boards were consulted. The Williston School Board and the Conservation Commission expressed little interest in the land. But the Recreation Committee said the Selectboard should at least consider the purchase.

The Selectboard discussed the recommendation for only a few minutes on Monday before unanimously voting not to buy the land.

“We can’t afford it,” said board member Ted Kenney.

Board member Jeff Fehrs said it would make little sense to spend the money without first knowing how the community center would be funded and where it should be located.

“We are certainly not hearing any clear use of the land right now,” he said.

Recreation Committee member Mike Healey said in an interview before the meeting that the group was not adamant that the Remy property was the right site for a community center. But they felt it was worth considering.

“Our thought is we should at least explore it because the need (for a community center) is so great in town,” he said.

Williston has long held the so-called right of first refusal on the Remy property. The clause came attached to the deed when the couple bought the land in 1992.

The Selectboard’s decision closes the books on a long-running saga for the Remys, who first filed an application to subdivide the land years ago but were repeatedly stymied in trying to win a town permit to develop the property.

“It’s been since 2001,” said John Remy in an interview after the board’s decision. “We’re looking forward to actually putting a shovel in the ground.”

The town’s approval of a development permit came after a pair of appeals before Vermont Environmental Court and what he said were expenditures totaling tens of thousands of dollars on lawyers and permitting fees.

The Development Review Board first approved an eight-home subdivision in 2006. But when the Remys went to get building permits, they were told by former zoning administrator D.K. Johnston that the homes exceeded limits on square footage spelled out in the conditions of approval.

Johnston counted garages in his calculation. The DRB later affirmed the decision.

The Remys appealed. The Environmental Court ruled that the town used improper procedure in deciding the matter and vacated the DRB’s decision.

After consulting with an attorney, Ken Belliveau, the town’s current planning director and zoning administrator, decided the garages should not be counted in the square footage, clearing the way for the development.

Tom Hergenrother Jr. plans to buy the land. He operates Colchester-based Hergenrother Custom Development LLC. His father’s company, a separate business, has built homes in the Coyote Run and Martell Hill subdivisions.

Hergenrother said he intends to start work on an access road for the development and home construction by the end of this month.

Meanwhile, the proposal to build a community center remains unsettled. A task force studied the issue, and in a 2007 report said it was undecided as to whether the better location would be in the village or near Taft Corners. The report said the best location would depend on what type of facility was constructed.

A second study group, an outgrowth of WING, or Williston Into the Next Generation, has also not decided on a location. The group’s leader, Sharon Gutwin, is currently talking with Town Manger Rick McGuire about formulating a business plan to determine how ongoing operation of a community center would be funded.

Virtually everyone involved has agreed that Williston needs a community center. But coming up with money for land, a new building and ongoing expenses has been a stumbling block.

Healey said he understood that without funding the Recreation Committee’s recommendation would be moot.

“If we don’t have the money, then we don’t have the money and the answer is no,” he said.

 

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Myers life celebrated as masterpiece (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Tim Simard

Observer staff

Laughter, tears and musical tributes filled Williston Central School Saturday afternoon as the community came together to remember and celebrate the life of longtime teacher Al Myers.

 


    Observer photo by Stephen Mease
Williston Central School Principal Jackie Parks presents a scrapbook to the Myers family with memories, writing and artwork from students and faculty.

 


    Observer photo by Stephen Mease
The Champlain Valley Reenactors give a traditional Civil War multi-gun salute at the end of the ceremony.

 


    Observer photo by Stephen Mease
Meredith Gordon, Myers’ youngest daughter, offers a few opening remarks.

 


    Observer photo by Stephen Mease
Members of the Lyric Theatre Company pop open umbrellas during a rendition of ‘Singing in the Rain.’

 


    Observer photo by Stephen Mease
Lyric Theatre Company Executive Director Syndi Zook dons a Groucho Marx mask alongside Myers’ wife, Deborah Hardy.

More than 700 community members and friends of Myers filled the school’s auditorium and the new gym. Those who attended were treated to musical performances from current and former students of Williston Central, as well as a singalong with members of the Lyric Theatre Company. Family members and friends of Myers remembered their friend with speeches of praise. And the University of Vermont honored Myers’ life with the creation of a new award.

“I know today is a celebration, and we’re going to laugh a little, we’re going to smile a little and we’re going to cry a little in the celebration,” said Bishop Britt Cummings of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

Myers passed away unexpectedly on April 25 after falling from a ladder in the Williston Central School auditorium while working on the set of the school play, “The Wizard of Oz.” He had been a teacher at the school for more than 30 years.

For those who attended, it was an “amazing ceremony” that honored a man who gave so much, said Andy Gordon, Myers’ son-in-law.

“I thought it was a very fitting tribute for someone who spent his whole life working for everybody,” Gordon said. “He would’ve been honored to see everyone here.”

The celebration took place in the auditorium and gym. Members of Lyric Theatre’s technical crew set up a live video feed between the locations, so all in attendance would be able to witness every tribute.

The Champlain Valley Reenactors, a group of Civil War enthusiasts that Myers captained, also honored their former leader by performing a drill for the audience. The reenactors culminated Saturday’s event with a multi-gun salute outside Williston Central School.

Myer’s youngest daughter, Meredith Gordon, spoke first. Honoring her father’s love of comedy, Gordon recited several famous quotes from the Marx Brothers and Monty Python in a humorous, deadpan fashion. Gordon also graciously thanked those gathered for their support over the past several weeks.

“You were all my dad’s extended family,” Gordon said.

A video tribute followed that featured family photos of Myers and a film of Myers during Civil War reenactments and directing his colleagues at Lyric Theatre. Paul Simon’s “You Can Call Me Al” played in the background, and the video was interspersed with cuts from the Marx Brothers’ classic comedy “Animal Crackers.”

Bishop Cummings also had many members of the audience laughing with his stories of Myers leading church youth groups on snowshoe hikes of Mount Mansfield and canoe trips on the Winooski River. Cummings also said Myers’ love of family, of his church and of God allowed his life to reflect a multifaceted work of art.

“He allowed the master artist to paint his life, and to paint a masterpiece,” Cummings said.

The executive director of Lyric Theatre, Syndi Zook, also remembered Myers with funny stories of his thespian days. She praised his family for the time Myers gave to the theater group, helping make Lyric Theatre what it is today.

“It doesn’t even begin to reflect the impact he had on the group,” Zook said.

Zook also led both the auditorium and gym audiences on singalongs of “Singin’ in the Rain” and “Tomorrow” from the play “Annie.” Members of Lyric Theatre spontaneously opened umbrellas from their seats and led the audience in the first song.

Music featured prominently throughout Saturday afternoon. Performances included the Beatles’ “Let It Be” sung by the newly formed Williston Central School Faculty Choir. Three of Myers’ Swift House students — Michelle and Mahoganie LaStrada and Jewel Sedgebeer — sang an original song in their teacher’s memory, “The Voice Within,” written by Michelle LaStrada. Williston resident Anne Cameron also sang an original song called the “The Man Behind the Curtain,” which she said she wrote three days after Myers’ death.

The biggest round of applause came for the chorus of “The Wizard of Oz.” The students sang “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” in front of the play’s set, which Myers’ designed last month.

Other tributes to Myers included Rep. Katie Webb of Shelburne presenting the school with a Vermont Legislature resolution honoring Myers’ life. Chittenden South Supervisory Union Superintendent Elaine Pinckney read a letter of praise from Sen. Patrick Leahy honoring Myers, which the senator entered into the U.S. Congressional record.

UVM Professor Jacqui Gale announced the university would create a new award, given to an “exemplary” student studying in the middle-level teaching program. Gale said the award, known as the Al Myers Excellence in Teaching Award, would be given every year in late April.

The ceremony concluded with a bagpipe rendition of “Amazing Grace” performed by Bill Kirkpatrick, followed by the reenactors marching out of the auditorium. It was a quiet ending to what reenactor Mike Frisbie called a “perfect ceremony.”

“It was just wonderful,” Frisbie said. “We were laughing and crying and everything in between.”

 

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Burrito restaurant breaks ground in Williston (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Tim Simard

Observer staff

After more than two years of planning, Williston will finally get it’s own Moe’s Southwest Grill. The restaurant should be open and operating sometime this fall, said local franchise owner Sueayn Wood.

Last week, DEW Construction Corp. crews broke ground at the Moe’s site, located off Marshall Avenue on Trader Lane in Taft Corners. The restaurant will be situated just east of PetSmart.

The Williston restaurant will be the second Moe’s in Vermont. Wood and her husband, Philip, own a Moe’s on Williston Road in South Burlington. The restaurant, which offers a “fast casual” cafeteria dining experience, serves burritos, fajitas, quesadillas, tacos and nachos, among other southwestern foods. Prices for most menu items are less than $10.

The South Burlington Moe’s has been open for nearly three years and is the seventh highest revenue-producing restaurant in the chain, according to company spokesperson Lauren McGowen. She said the chain has about 400 locations, mostly on the East Coast and in the Midwest.

Wood said affordability and quality food bring in customers from all over the Burlington area.

“It’s a very value-oriented concept,” Wood said. “Everything is made fresh and everything is made to order. And Vermonters appreciate those things.”

Having two Moe’s locations relatively close to one another should bring more customers to the franchise, Wood said. Having a restaurant in Taft Corners could bring even more awareness to Moe’s for Williston residents and other shoppers to the big box stores, she added.

“It amazes me to this day how many people in Williston don’t know about Moe’s,” Wood said. “I think they’ll be totally excited when they see what we have to offer.”

Moe’s Southwest Grill could also be the first LEED-certified restaurant in Williston. LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is a national standard for green and sustainable building construction. Projects that work toward LEED certification must adhere to a list of environmentally oriented construction designs to receive certification.

Wood said with the help and guidance of DEW Construction, Efficiency Vermont and Vermont Gas Systems Inc., Moe’s should obtain its certification. She said it’s an expensive process, but well worth it in the end.

“I don’t feel I could do this any other way,” Wood said. “It’s a part of my value system now.”

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Burrito restaurant breaks ground in Williston (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Tim Simard

Observer staff

After more than two years of planning, Williston will finally get it’s own Moe’s Southwest Grill. The restaurant should be open and operating sometime this fall, said local franchise owner Sueayn Wood.

Last week, DEW Construction Corp. crews broke ground at the Moe’s site, located off Marshall Avenue on Trader Lane in Taft Corners. The restaurant will be situated just east of PetSmart.

The Williston restaurant will be the second Moe’s in Vermont. Wood and her husband, Philip, own a Moe’s on Williston Road in South Burlington. The restaurant, which offers a “fast casual” cafeteria dining experience, serves burritos, fajitas, quesadillas, tacos and nachos, among other southwestern foods. Prices for most menu items are less than $10.

The South Burlington Moe’s has been open for nearly three years and is the seventh highest revenue-producing restaurant in the chain, according to company spokesperson Lauren McGowen. She said the chain has about 400 locations, mostly on the East Coast and in the Midwest.

Wood said affordability and quality food bring in customers from all over the Burlington area.

“It’s a very value-oriented concept,” Wood said. “Everything is made fresh and everything is made to order. And Vermonters appreciate those things.”

Having two Moe’s locations relatively close to one another should bring more customers to the franchise, Wood said. Having a restaurant in Taft Corners could bring even more awareness to Moe’s for Williston residents and other shoppers to the big box stores, she added.

“It amazes me to this day how many people in Williston don’t know about Moe’s,” Wood said. “I think they’ll be totally excited when they see what we have to offer.”

Moe’s Southwest Grill could also be the first LEED-certified restaurant in Williston. LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is a national standard for green and sustainable building construction. Projects that work toward LEED certification must adhere to a list of environmentally oriented construction designs to receive certification.

Wood said with the help and guidance of DEW Construction, Efficiency Vermont and Vermont Gas Systems Inc., Moe’s should obtain its certification. She said it’s an expensive process, but well worth it in the end.

“I don’t feel I could do this any other way,” Wood said. “It’s a part of my value system now.”

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Solar learning

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    Observer photo by Tim Simard
Earth Turbines Customer Support Specialist Caleb Elder and Special Projects Engineer Chris Tall inspect the new AllSun Tracker at The Bellwether School on Friday.  See story below.

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Sports Notes (5/14/09)

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May 14, 2009

Girls lacrosse to play three games in five days

It is a busy few days for the Champlain Union High girls lacrosse team.

The 0-7 Redhawks, following Wednesday’s home contest against Burlington High, travel to Mount Anthony Union in Bennington Saturday and then return home for Monday and Wednesday fixtures against Rutland High and Mount Mansfield Union.

Rutland’s visit is a make-up of a game originally slated for April 25.

The Redhawks will no doubt be thinking defense on the bus to Bennington. Mount Anthony’s Patriots came to Mount Mansfield last Saturday and uncorked 35 shots on the Cougars’ goal in rolling to a 21-12 victory over 4-5 MMU.

Last week, CVU lost at home on Wednesday 13-6 (two goals by Liz Betz) and Saturday at Middlebury Union, 14-5.

CVU golfers win at Essex course

Andre Bedard fired a 77 Tuesday to lead the Champlain Valley Union High golf team to a victory over Rice Memorial High, Mount Abraham Union and Milton High at the Essex golf course.

Bedard also won medalist honors by two strokes over teammate Alex Socinsky and two Mount Abraham players.

Eric Robinson shot an 83 for the Redhawks, followed by Billy Wilson (89) and Jack Tomashot (90).

 

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