July 22, 2014

Redhawks blank St. J on the diamond (5/21/09)

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Baseball team heads to Essex on Thursday

May 21, 2009

By Mal Boright

Observer correspondent

Returning to winning ways Tuesday with an 8-0 home bopping of St. Johnsbury Academy, the young but surging Champlain Valley Union High baseball team will take on one of the Metro Division’s ruling class Thursday, when the Redhawks invade Essex High for a 4:30 p.m. test against the 9-2 (beginning of the week) Hornets.

Now 4-7, coach Tim Albertson’s Redhawks will then travel down Route 116 to Bristol and Mount Abraham for an 11 a.m. game on Saturday against the solid Eagles, who bumped off the Hawks 7-2 in the mid-April season-opener in Hinesburg.

The victory over 2-9 St. Johnsbury was especially tasty for the Hawks, who had suffered a galling 11-10 defeat at home Saturday to Milton High when the Blue Devils rallied from an 8-5 deficit with a six-run explosion in the top of the seventh.

But that became distant history Tuesday, when freshman Curt Echo and junior Andrew Leckerling combined for a six-hit shutout to go with an errorless defense.

“This was good today,” Albertson said, noting that the team will be in a good frame of mind for the Essex trip.

CVU has won four of its last five games after opening the season with six straight defeats.

Echo, in gaining his first varsity triumph, scattered five hits, walked four and whiffed six Hilltoppers over the first six innings.

“He threw 93 pitches and 65 were for strikes,” said Redhawks pitching coach Onnie Matthews. “That is very good.”

Leckerling took over in the seventh and shut down the visitors with just a single.

Echo’s only hint of serious trouble came in the top of the fourth when, with one out, Hilltoppers Shane Thorgalson and Mike Guidosh reached on backyard sale hits, a pair of real cheapies. One was a slow grounder under an infielder’s glove, the other a pop between the mound and third base.

With the game scoreless at the time, the two runners were sacrificed to second and third, but Echo then got a strikeout to end the threat.

In the bottom of the fourth, CVU struck for all of its runs, the door being opened when the first two batters, Joe Myers and David Titus, reached on infield miscues. Echo then reached on a well-positioned bunt single, which rolled to the shortstop, loading the bases.

Jared Badger lined a two-run single to center. After Andrew Nick was walked, Collin Teator ripped a shot to right center to drive in two more runs. The pings just kept coming as Leckerling, Konnor Fleming and Myers bashed consecutive RBI singles and Titus stroked an RBI grounder.

Heartbreaker vs. Milton High

The conditions Tuesday were windy, causing some adventures with infield pop-ups. But it was routine when compared with Saturday’s high winds, particularly at the start of the game.

Both starting pitchers, Teator and Milton’s Alex Duchesneau, ran into control problems, no doubt partially caused by trying to stay on the mound in gale force winds.

Teator left after two innings in which he allowed just two hits but walked five and allowed three tallies, only one of which was earned.

Down 3-0 going into the bottom of the second, CVU struck for four runs on Andrew Nick’s two-run double and Teator’s two-run single after Duchesneau had set the stage with three walks.

The Redhawks hiked the edge to 7-3 and 8-5 before Milton struck for the six-spot in the top of the seventh off Nick, who had pitched four innings of strong relief going into the frame, and Emily Sackett.

Down 11-8, CVU bounced back with two runs and had the bases loaded with one out before losing a runner at the plate for the second out. A ground out finished off the Redhawks.

 

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Track and field team preps for final home meet (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Mal Boright

Observer correspondent

The home folks will get their last look at Champlain Valley Union High’s track and field team Tuesday afternoon when teams from Vergennes Union High, Milton High and Mount Mansfield Union High descend on the Redhawks’ facility for the last home meet of the campaign.

 


    Observer photo by Pogo Senior
With room to spare, Champlain Valley Union High sophomore Summer Spillane easily clears the bar during the pole vaulting competition at the track meet hosted by CVU last Wednesday.

And the team’s followers will gaze upon some stellar performers in the red and white outfits, as results from Tuesday’s meet at Essex High would indicate. The CVU boys won their division, while the girls finished second to the host Hornets in the four-team contests. Bellows Free Academy of St. Albans and Missisquoi Union were also involved.

CVU boys winners included Matt Sulva in the 400-meter race with a time of 54.81 seconds, with teammate Ryan Nick taking second.

Jason Clairmont captured the 800 in 2:07.47. Tony Sulva hit a winning stride in the 1,500, beating out second place teammate Zak Pete.

Both the 4-by-400 and 4-by-800 relay teams were victorious.

James Pieper-Lococo took second in the 110 and 300 hurdles.

In field events, Scott Cherhoniak won the triple jump (36-8.75) and Dale Conger the shot put (40-9.5).

For the second place girls, it was a sweep in the 800, where Kendall Berry won with a time of 2:29.33; Summer Spillane took second and Virginia Farley third.

Maddy Christian ruled the 1,500 with a time of 5:04.44, with Farley second.

The 4-by-400 relay team also scored a victory.

 

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Federal grant to teach safety for bikers, walkers (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Tim Simard

Observer staff

The Williston School District recently received more than $14,000 in federal grant money to help educate students about bike and pedestrian safety, as well as determine the safest alternative transportation routes to school.

As part of the Vermont Agency of Transportation’s Safe Routes to School program, both schools in the district will split up the funding — $6,780 going to Allen Brook School and $7,415 for Williston Central School.

Williston received the funding through the efforts of the nonprofit organization Local Motion. The Burlington-based group works to foster alternative and active transportation through education and the creation of new bike routes throughout northwestern Vermont. Local Motion secured more than $103,000 in grant money from VTrans for schools around Chittenden County, including Williston.

Starting in the fall, students in the district will take part in educational programs focusing on walking and biking to school, as well as how to do so safely. Charlene Wallace, the director of operations for Local Motion, said the Safe Routes to School program encourages students to find alternative means for getting to and from school, as well as teaching them safety.

“We can help students get outside before school starts and after it ends,” Wallace said. “And we know that physical activity improves educational performance.”

Wallace said the funding goes toward events for the Safe Routes to School program, as well as supporting the program’s coordinators, who will visit students during physical education classes.

Aimee Pope, the Safe Routes to School coordinator with VTrans, said the program is 100 percent federally funded. Starting next school year, 75 schools around Vermont will participate, Pope said.

Wallace said Safe Routes to School coordinators from Local Motion will visit physical education classes in Williston several times next school year. The fall semester will be geared toward information about walking to school and determining safe routes for students. Wallace said students would learn which side of the road is best to walk on, as well as how to use crosswalks and road signals.

In the spring, students in grades three through eight will learn about bicycling to school and the safety issues that can arise from that.

Wallace said Williston might choose to start an incentive program for students who choose to walk or bike to school. Schools in the past have created punch cards for students, she said. Once a student walks or bikes to school a certain number of times, as determined through the punch card, that student may receive a prize.

Cathy Kohlasch, a physical education teacher at Williston Central, said the idea of bringing the Safe Routes to School program to the district would help the department. Kohlasch said students learn about pedestrian and biker safety “sporadically” in school, but this will make it a focus.

“With all the bike paths going through town, it seemed like a natural fit to us,” Kohlasch said.

While some students will invariably live too far from school to walk or bike to class, they’ll still learn the importance of safety in these activities, Wallace said.

“These are life lessons,” Wallace said.

 

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Police Notes (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

Theft

• Items from a purse, including prescription medication, were stolen from an unlocked storage locker at Sports & Fitness Edge on Wellness Drive on May 11, according to police reports. Anyone with information is asked to call Williston Police at 878-6611.

• Approximately $6,000 worth of tools was stolen from a truck at Curtis Lumber on May 12, according to police reports. The case is under investigation.

• About $1,000 worth of parts was stolen off paving equipment parked at the intersection of U.S. 2 and Industrial Avenue on May 17, according to police reports. The case is under investigation.

Driving under the influence

As a result of a “hit and run accident” on May 14, Siobhan I. Mayer, 48, of Essex Junction was cited on a charge of driving under the influence, according to police reports. Mayer was also cited on a charge of leaving the scene of an accident and violations of conditions of release, according to the report. Her blood alcohol test registered .206, the report notes. The legal limit for driving is .08 in Vermont. She was cited to appear in court.

Shooting

Police responding to a report of people shooting guns on May 17 found two men “shooting off Redmond Road,” and informed them that shooting was not permitted in that area, according to police reports. The men left “without incident,” the report notes.

Vandalism

The back of the Wal-Mart building was vandalized on May 15, according to police reports. Anyone with information is asked to call Williston Police at 878-6611.

Trespassing

• Jill Garrant, 28, of Essex was issued a no trespass notice from Wal-Mart on May 12, according to police reports. No other information was released.

• Justin Frappier, 28, of Grand Isle was issued a no trespass notice from Wal-Mart on May 13, according to police reports. No other information was released.

• Kayla D. Crosby, 31, of Rutland was issued a no trespass notice from Clark’s Sunoco on May 13, according to police reports. She was issued another no trespass notice on May 13 from Residence Inn in Williston, according to reports. No other information was released.

Illegal camping

Police responding to a report of people “camping out” at Lake Iroquois Beach on May 13 found two people camping, and informed them that camping was not permitted at the beach, according to police reports. The campers left “without incident,” the report notes.

Wanted person

James McCoy, 24, of Winooski was arrested on an outstanding warrant on May 13 for “failure to appear in court,” according to police reports. He was taken to Chittenden County Correctional Center, the report notes.

Disorderly conduct

Deron Elliott, 41, of Williston was cited on a charge of disorderly conduct on May 12 after allegedly being “verbally threatening and verbally abusive” to someone in a checkout line at a local business, according to police reports. No other information was released.

Driving with suspended license

Following a motor vehicle stop on May 12, Melissa A. Sird, 27, of Burlington was cited on a charge of “criminal” driving with a suspended license, according to police reports. She was cited to appear in court.

 

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Everyday Gourmet (5/21/09)

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A crowd pleaser

May 21, 2009

By Kim Dannies

With potlucks, bridal showers and graduation parties upon us, why not choose a festive Mexican theme that’s easy on the clock and the pocketbook? I’ve made these super-delish, healthy enchiladas a few times for gatherings, and now it’s the only dish my girlfriends will let me bring. It is so fast, I don’t even season the sauce, and one 8-by-12-inch pan feeds 10 people. The rice and chicken can be prepped a few days ahead; make the casserole 2 hours ahead, it only takes about 10 minutes.

Encore Enchiladas

30 ounces medium-hot salsa

1 16-ounce package of fresh spinach

4 10-inch flour tortillas (not whole wheat)

1 16-ounce can spicy, fat-free refried beans

2 cups cooked brown rice

12 ounces Monterey Jack cheese, shredded

12 ounces grilled boneless chicken breast, cut into dice-sized cubes

Cover the bottom of an 8-by-10-inch (approximate size) baking dish with 6 ounces of salsa. Poke a few holes into the plastic package of spinach and zap for 2 minutes, until slightly wilted. Lay 4 10-inch flour tortillas on a work surface. Divide the can of refried beans among the tortillas, spreading 4 ounces of the bean paste evenly. On one half of each tortilla, layer 1 ounce of cheese, 3 ounces of diced chicken, 1/4 portion of spinach and a handful of brown rice. Carefully roll the tortillas and place seam side down into baking dish. (Stuff any food drops into the rolled tortillas.) Cover with remaining sauce and top with cheese. Bake in a preheated oven at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. The tortillas will soften and form a lasagna-like casserole. Cut into squares and serve with green salad.

Avocado Salad with Cilantro Lime Dressing

In a small processor combine 1 bunch rinsed and de-stemmed fresh cilantro and a large garlic clove. Pulse until minced. Add 1/2 cup fresh lime juice, 1/4 cup olive oil, 2 teaspoons of fish sauce, a pinch of kosher salt and 2 teaspoons of brown sugar; blend until smooth. Makes 6 ounces of dressing.

Combine a variety of fresh mixed greens (figure a handful of greens per person) and 1/2 of a red onion, thinly sliced. With clean hands, toss the salad, adding half the dressing and then adjusting for quantity. Gently fold in as many avocado slices as desired. Top with a grind of black pepper.

Kim Dannies is a graduate of La Varenne Cooking School in France. She lives in Williston with her husband, Jeff; they have three college-aged daughters who come and go. For archived Everyday Gourmet columns go to kimdannies.com.

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Letters to the Editor (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

If it’s not broke, don’t fix it!

It may not be perfect, but if it works, leave it alone.

I came away from Monday night’s meeting on May 11 disappointed with the presentation of information regarding a roundabout for the village. I felt I was given statistics on a national level to persuade me we need a roundabout. I think statistics can be misleading and not fit in everywhere.

I also felt like there was not enough evidence presented that we have a dangerous intersection. I was pleased to hear a fire department member’s report that it was clear we have had few serious accidents in the last few years. Something like four fender benders and one with a person injured. They occurred during non-busy traffic hours.

I don’t understand paying millions of dollars to build a roundabout for heavy traffic that occurs one hour a day for five days a week, or maybe a little more, when our present four-way stop is working so well.

I was also very pleased to hear a former selectman remind us of the work and thousands, if not millions, of dollars that went into planning for the Circ Highway that would have relieved wear and tear on our local roads and redirected traffic away from our village center. Let’s not repeat this situation.

It was evident from the future steps needed in the planning process that it could easily cost millions of dollars — another Circ Highway situation — even though we are told it will cost just over a million dollars to build.

Ginger Isham

Williston

Grateful friends

We in the Williston School District want to express our most sincere thanks to everyone who helped create last Saturday’s celebration of Al Myers’ life.

Many volunteers worked on tasks, from ushering to arranging overflow parking and directing traffic. The technical challenges of closed circuit TV and audio running in two different directions were great, and we couldn’t have done it without all the expert assistance we received. Moreover, support came not only from individuals, but from businesses across Chittenden County, all of whom had some connection with Al.

Of course, the centerpieces were the marvelous speakers and performances ranging from solo piano through bagpipe to choruses that filled the stage with people and song. All drew on their experience with Al. Their words and art brought tears to many eyes.

It was truly a team effort, and together we created a worthy tribute to our friend, Al Myers. Thank you again.

Rick McCraw and Richard Allen

Williston School District

 

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Guest Column (5/21/09)

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Auf wiedersehen, Williston!

May 21, 2009

By Bianca Jager

One and a half years ago, I arrived at the Burlington Airport. Very nervous! I kind of calmed down with saying to myself, “It will be fine, I’ll get my luggage and then I will meet my new host family.”

But the Jennings were faster! They picked me up before I could even finish that thought. I saw all those blond little heads in front of the gate’s entrance. I was about to die, because I was so nervous. But not for long. Not even a minute later I was so happy and the question, “Why did I do this? Why do I have to go away from home?” never even came back into my mind.

I have never met a family like them. They are so full of energy, lovely, funny, kind. I will probably never find the right expression to say how awesome they are.

Then, after six months in Vermont, my host mum’s mother came to stay with us. Nervous again! But I have to tell you, she is the coolest lady I have ever met in my life.

I wish every au pair that makes that step and goes to a foreign country, nervous about her destination and the people she will meet there, will have so much luck like I had.

I have to say this was the best decision I have ever made in my life. And I would tell everybody who thinks about it to go for it. Who knows, maybe I will see your kids sometime in Germany or Europe, having the most awesome year of their life like I had.

My time as an au pair did come to an end, and I have to say, auf wiedersehen — goodbye.

I will miss Williston and all the nice people I met here. I really appreciate how kind and helpful everybody was. Thank you so much for that. All the great activities the town does, how kind the teachers are in the school and also all of Laura, Emma, Adele and Charlie’s friends. I want to say thank you to every single one of you. I don’t think there would have been a better place to be an au pair than in this lovely little town and also no better host family than the Jennings. I will miss you all a lot.

I will never forget the great time I had here and hope to see some of you some time again.

Dankeschön for all the help you gave me, Williston residents.

Bianca Jager served as an au pair for the Jennings family in Williston from November 2007 until earlier this month.

 

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Little Details (5/21/09)

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Helping hands, transformed lives

 

By Katherine Bielawa Stamper

In order to graduate from Williston Central School, all students are required to complete an Eighth Grade Challenge. This year-long academic project requires each student to research a topic he or she is interested in, integrate an element of community service and formally present findings before peers, teachers and community members. Topics range from addressing hunger, to sports psychology, to drumming. Sound daunting? You bet.

 


    Courtesy photo
Mario, a mason from Honduras, shows Joy Trigg (left) and her son, Niles, how to build with concrete blocks at the IHNFA worksite in the town of Tela. The Triggs went to Honduras in January to volunteer with Hands to Honduras, an organization that provides educational, cultural and humanitarian assistance.

Niles Trigg, a current eighth grader, was looking for a project engaging him in active volunteerism while satisfying his natural curiosity about foreign cultures. As a student of Spanish, he was excited to learn of a service trip to Central America, offering the chance to work on humanitarian building projects while testing his linguistic skills among native speakers.

“I’ve always been interested in volunteering,” Niles observed. “When the tsunami happened (in the Asian Pacific), I wanted to help. I thought it would be good to help folks outside of the United States. It’s hard to find international volunteer opportunities that kids can participate in.”

Niles’ mother, Joy, read a news article in January 2008 about a group of Vermonters traveling to Honduras to perform volunteer work through a program called Hands to Honduras (www.handstohonduras.org). The organization provides educational, cultural and humanitarian assistance.

“Every January, volunteers from Vermont travel with Hands to Honduras to the small Central American nation to build community centers and schools or to set up clinics,” Niles said.

On Jan. 24, following a careful year of planning, Niles and his mother flew from Burlington to San Pedro Sula, Honduras. The weary travelers — a group of about 80 volunteers — piled into vans at the airport for a two-and-a-half hour trip to Tela, their first work site.

“Niles and I took this trip because we had enough of typical vacations,” Joy said, “and I sensed this would be a life-changing event for both of us.”

Through the windows of the van, Niles’ first glimpses of Honduras were surprisingly western. They passed a Pizza Hut and ubiquitous Pepsi signs as their caravan snaked its way out of the city. Fast-food icons of multinational corporations were soon replaced by endless banana trees and simple houses with roofs of corrugated iron.

“We passed lots of banana plantations. The roads were bumpy. We came to this one-way bridge where our van had to stop and wait. (Local) kids knew the cars had to stop. They came right up to the window to sell us coconut,” Niles remembered, a hint of surprise in his voice.

“Our hotel in Tela was very simple. Our room had a couple of beds and a tiny TV that sometimes worked. Our room was apparently the room with hot water — we were lucky,” Niles laughed. “We had to close our eyes and hold our breath when we showered — there were parasites in the water. We used a gallon of (store-bought) water to brush our teeth and wash our faces.”

Niles remembers eating lots of rice, beans and fish. The fruit included just-picked bananas and succulent papayas, some as long as two feet. Abundant, fragrant flowers seemed like oversized versions of plants he’d encountered in North America. Pepsi advertisements seeped into smaller towns and tiny villages. The syrupy soda appeared to be consumed with gusto in this nation lacking potable tap water. Niles observed blackened, rotten teeth among many of the children.

“Our group built two new school rooms at IHNFA, a government-run daycare center in Tela. We used cinderblocks and mortar. It was really hot and humid,” Niles recalled. “We started work around 9 (o’clock) and finished around 4:30 most days. It was hard work. I got used to it.

“The (Honduran) people were extremely accepting and welcoming. They were very proud to show us what they had. A few could speak a little English. I could understand a good amount of what they said in Spanish and learned to apply what I know,” Niles said.

“This one lady in Las Palmas (a rural worksite), she basically didn’t have anything at all. She lived in a stick and mud hut and used one sheet of metal to cook on,” Niles observed. “She saw what we were doing — building a schoolhouse and a library — she burst into tears, she was so grateful.”

An important element of the Eighth Grade Challenge is sharing something of one’s experience to inform and inspire others. Niles contacted Mary Jane Wirsling, his former teacher at Allen Brook School’s Vista Team, to arrange a screening of a short film he produced on location. Here are some comments from his audience of third and fourth graders:

Allie P.-R.: “Going to Honduras was a brilliant idea for your Eighth Grade Challenge. Now I know how lucky I really am … By the looks of the movie, you did a great job on building the school.”

Alexis M.: “I learned that Honduras is a very poor country … I’m more thankful for having fancy gadgets …”

Molly D.: “I think it was a very kind choice to choose helping a poor country as your Eighth Grade Challenge. It must have been kind of scary not knowing if you could get sick by taking a shower!”

Brigham F: “I think it is really cool how you went to Honduras and helped all the children.”

Maddie H.: “I never thought about how grateful I am to have everything I’ve always had until watching your video about Honduras.”

Reflecting on his experience in Honduras, Niles said, “I learned a lot about myself in the sense that we, as Americans, have everything we want at our fingertips. Still, we sometimes miss the smaller things in life that really matter, like cooperation and community. People in Honduras, even though they have so little, are really happy.”

“It is a priceless gift to be able help a desperately poor culture — to live, work and laugh among the people there for a week,” Joy observed. “Niles and I realized quickly that their lives are very rich with warmth and sharing. And, that it’s not things that make us rich — it’s experiences like this trip.”

Visit www.youtube.com and search for “Hands to Honduras” or enter www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFTzOxoWNKk to watch Niles’ film.

Katherine Bielawa Stamper lives in Williston. Reader comments are welcome at [email protected] or [email protected]

 

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Scrapbook store looks to become mainstay in town (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

By Tim Simard

Observer staff

Taft Corners Shopping Center is now home to Williston’s newest scrapbook store. Island Scrapbook opened on April 10 and has already generated buzz in the local community, thanks to the store’s Friday night “crop” parties.

 


    Observer photo by Tim Simard
Island Scrapbook owner Laura Sharples (right) examines a new shipment of scrapbook supplies with her friend Lorna Swann.

Owner Laura Sharples said she was looking to expand her business into busy Chittenden County and believes Williston will prove a good fit. She has owned the original Island Scrapbook in Grand Isle for the past four years.

Island Scrapbook offers everything needed to create a scrapbook, from binders to different paper styles, from various tools to unique design flourishes.

Sharples said Williston has been lacking a scrapbook supply store since Scrapbook Central closed two years ago. She hopes her store will fill that specific need in the Williston area, although on a smaller scale.

“I think the key to my success will be staying within my means,” Sharples said.

Having a weekly crop party could also be a way of forming a loyal customer base, she said. Since she opened last month, Sharples has hosted several Friday night events where people can come together to create, or crop, they’re very own scrapbook. Sharples said it acts like a social get together, with friends helping friends design creative books.

She said the Friday parties have lasted until midnight and most attendees are already experienced scrapbook enthusiasts looking for a good place to work.

“They’re looking for a place to get away from the husband, the kids,” Sharples said. “It gives them time to focus.”

Sharples also attends scrapbook parties all over the Champlain Valley, providing supplies and assistance. Many of the shows she’s attended are charity events in places including Winooski, St. Albans and Plattsburgh, N.Y.

Sharples’ friend Lorna Swann, a Northfield resident, said scrapbooking acts as a creative outlet for people, as well as a way of preserving someone’s past. Plus, they make great gifts, she said.

“It’s homemade, it’s personal,” Swann said. “The scrapbooks that people make will outlive the people they give them to.”

“It’s a preservation of memories,” Sharples added.

Island Scrapbook is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The store is closed Mondays, but will be open this Memorial Day Monday, Sharples said.

 

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Around Town (5/21/09)

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May 21, 2009

Recreation guide available

The Williston Parks and Recreation Department released its summer 2009 activity guide last week.

The program contains information on many youth activity camps scheduled for the summer, including soccer, baseball and basketball camps. Specialty camps, such as art and music camps, are highlighted. Recreation Director Kevin Finnegan said this summer’s offerings are similar to last year’s popular events.

Also included in the program is information in this year’s Fourth of July celebration. The theme will center on the 400-year anniversary of Lake Champlain’s discovery by European explorers.

The summer guide can be picked up at the Parks and Recreation office on the second floor of Town Hall Annex. Call 878-1239 for more information.

Residents honored for volunteerism

HowardCenter’s Community Friends Mentoring program recognized two Williston community members last month for their enthusiasm and commitment over the past year.

Deb Chisholm is in her 11th year of mentoring. Nancy Colbourn is in her third. The two women joined 100 other volunteers to provide approximately 14,000 hours of service to Chittenden County youth over the past year in big-brother and big-sister type of relationships.

The Burlington-based HowardCenter aims to improve the wellbeing of children, adults, families and communities. The Community Friends Mentoring program is now in its 25th year.

To join the program or learn more about it, contact program coordinator Kristen Hayden-West at 488-6650 or visit www.howardcenter.org/friends.

 

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